How to Connect a Sink Drain to a Sewer Line

Written by nathan mcginty
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How to Connect a Sink Drain to a Sewer Line
Connect a sink drain to a sewer line for proper drainage. (Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images)

After installing a bathroom sink and fixtures, one of the last steps is connecting the sink drain to the sewer line. Most sink drains consist of three separate parts: the flange, the tailpiece and the p-trap. The flange is the visible part of the drain that sits at the bottom of the sink. The tailpiece is a straight piece of plumbing that connects to the underside of the flange, while the p-trap connects the tailpiece to the sewer inlet.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Things you need

  • Bathroom cleaner
  • Paper towels
  • Rags
  • Sink drain kit (flange, tailpiece, p-trap, jamb nut)
  • Plumber's putty
  • Pipe thread compound

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Clean out the bottom of the sink with a bathroom cleaner and paper towels or rags.

  2. 2

    Open the plumber's putty and pull out a chunk of putty about the size of a dime. Roll this out into a flat line. Turn the flange upside down and press the putty into place on the underside of the flange.

  3. 3

    Turn the flange right side up. Screw the tailpiece into the underside of the flange.

  4. 4

    Slip the tailpiece and flange through the bottom of the sink. Press the flange into place, turning slightly as you do so to mash down the putty.

  5. 5

    Move underneath the sink. Press the rubber washers into place on the inside of the jamb nut. Slip the jamb nut over the end of the tailpiece and tighten it in place on the underside of the sink.

  6. 6

    Apply pipe thread compound to the threads on the bottom of the tailpiece and on the sewer inlet pipe.

  7. 7

    Slip the p-trap into place between the sewer inlet and the tailpiece. Slide the couplings over the ends and tighten.

  8. 8

    Run water in the sink above. Keep your eyes on the new drainpipe and check for leaks. Tighten the couplings, if needed.

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