DISCOVER
×

How to Tell if an FBI ID Card Is Real

Updated February 21, 2017

Fake Federal Bureau for Investigation (FBI) badges are freely available at many websites. Some of them look so real that even government agencies can be fooled into letting fake ID badge holders enter their facilities. If an FBI agent shows up at your door and waves an FBI badge, or if you are pulled over while driving by someone claiming to be an FBI agent, you'll want to make sure that badge is real before giving over personal information or exposing yourself to potential danger.

Look at the photo ID and note the FBI agent's name.

Ask the agent for his office number and then tell the agent that you are going to verify his information before you speak to him. A legitimate FBI agent will not mind if you conduct a check before speaking to them.

Look up the number for your local FBI office. You can find the number in the government offices listings in the telephone book. Verify that the number the agent gave you and the number in the phone book match. If they don't match. it's possible that the agent is from out of the area. You'll be able to confirm this with your local field office.

Call the local FBI office and state you want to verify an FBI officer's identity. The field office will be able to reassure you is a legitimate officer is at your door.

Tip

Make sure you are in a safe location. If you see flashing lights in your rearview, pull into a busy petrol station or convenience store. If the FBI is knocking on your front door, keep your screen door closed or keep the chain on the door to prevent intruders from walking in.

Things You'll Need

  • Phone
Cite this Article A tool to create a citation to reference this article Cite this Article

About the Author

Stephanie Ellen teaches mathematics and statistics at the university and college level. She coauthored a statistics textbook published by Houghton-Mifflin. She has been writing professionally since 2008. Ellen holds a Bachelor of Science in health science from State University New York, a master's degree in math education from Jacksonville University and a Master of Arts in creative writing from National University.