How to Remove Brass Casters From Antique Chair Legs

Written by lisa wampler
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Casters are small wheels attached to the legs of an object such as an antique chair. The casters allow you to move the object around without picking it up. Brass casters on antique chair legs attach using two different methods. The first method is a caster attached to a base plate that attaches to the bottom of the leg with screws. The second method is a caster connected to a pin that is pressed into a hole drilled into the bottom of the leg. Both are relatively easy to remove.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Things you need

  • Screwdriver
  • Pliers

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Place the chair on its side or upside down so you have easier access to the casters. Inspect the casters for a base plate. The base plate will have four screws, likely flat head, securing the caster to the bottom of the leg. You usually find these types of casters on legs that are large in diameter. If you cannot locate four screws, then the caster uses a pin that presses into the bottom of the leg.

  2. 2

    Remove the four screws with a flathead screwdriver. If your casters are not held on with screws, skip to Step 3. Be very cautious. Old furniture is usually made of hardwood and removing old slotted screws can be frustrating. Take your time so you can avoid the screwdriver slipping off the screw head and gouging the wood. Also, take caution not to strip the screw head with the screwdriver. When the four screws are removed, simply lift the caster off the bottom of the leg.

  3. 3

    Wrap one arm around the leg of the chair and grip the leg firmly with your hand. Grasp the caster firmly with the other hand and pull straight out. If the caster does not pull out easily, grip the caster wheel with a pair of pliers and pull. Never use the leg for prying leverage as this will damage the wood.

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