A homemade automatic fish feeder

Written by naomi bolton Google
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A homemade automatic fish feeder
Automatic fish feeders take care of the most basic needs for your fish when you are not home. (Aquarium image by crossgolfing from Fotolia.com)

The majority of coral reef fish feed throughout the day. Certain species such as the seahorse require live food in the aquarium, as they instinctively hunt only tiny creatures that move. Anthias, together with other small marine fish types, feed continually on plankton. Aquarium owners who keep these seawater fish species, typically offer live brine shrimp as a food source. Hobbyists can ensure the continual supply of live food to their coral fish by making an automatic feeder.

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Things you need

  • 1.14 litre (1 quart) plastic bottle, including top
  • Drill and bit
  • Two pieces of 5 cm (2 inch) rigid 2.3 cm (0.9 inch) diameter pipe
  • Small tube of non-toxic 100 per cent silicone sealer
  • Kettle
  • Small bowl
  • 60 cm (2 foot) long piece of air line tubing
  • 30 cm (1 foot) long piece of air line tubing
  • Wall mounted bracket to hold a 1.14 litre (1 quart) bottle
  • Aquarium water
  • Vibrator air pump
  • Electrical timer
  • Live brine shrimp

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Drill two holes, 2.3 cm (0.9 inch) diameter, next to each other in the top of a 1.14 litre (1 quart) plastic bottle. Place the first 5 cm (2 inch) piece of rigid 2.3 cm (0.9 inch) diameter pipe into one of the holes.

  2. 2

    Use a pea-sized amount of non-toxic, 100 per cent silicone sealer to form a watertight seal around the entry hole. Smooth the silicone out with your finger.

  3. 3

    Place the second 5 cm (2 inch) piece of rigid 2.3 cm (0.9 inch) diameter pipe into the remaining hole. Use another pea-sized amount of non-toxic, 100 per cent silicone sealer to form a watertight seal around this entry hole. Smooth the silicone out with your finger. Allow the bottle top and silicone to cure for at least a day.

  4. 4

    Pour a small volume of boiling water into the bowl and place one end of the 60 cm (2 foot) piece of air line tubing into the bowl.

  5. 5

    Push this end of the 60 cm (2 foot) long piece of air line tubing over the end of one of the 5 cm (2 inch) long pieces of rigid 2.3 cm (0.9 inch) diameter pipe. Place the opposite end of the 30 cm (1 foot) long piece of tubing into the aquarium. Place one end of a 30 cm (1 foot) piece of air line tubing into the bowl of boiling water.

  6. 6

    Push this end of the 30 cm (1 foot) long piece of air line tubing over the end of the second 5 cm (2 inch) long piece of rigid 2.3 cm (0.9 inch) diameter pipe. Attach the opposite end of the 30 cm (1 foot) long piece of tubing to the exhaust nozzle of your vibrator air pump.

  7. 7

    Plug the electrical timer into a wall power source, but do not turn it on yet. Plug the vibrator air pump into an electrical timer.

  8. 8

    Pour aquarium water to the halfway mark in the 1.14 litre (1 quart) bottle. Add 200 to 300 living brine shrimp to the bottle. Replace the top on the bottle and ensure that it is fitting tightly.

  9. 9

    Invert the 1.14 litre (1 quart) bottle and position it carefully in the wall mounted bracket, just above the aquarium. Set the electrical timer to run for a maximum of 10 minutes every hour. Set the electrical timer to run only during the time that the aquarium light is on.

  10. 10

    Turn on the wall power supply. Air from the vibrator air pump will slowly fill the bottle and displace water and brine shrimp into the aquarium, throughout the day.

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