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How to reply to a blank RSVP for a wedding

Updated April 17, 2017

Most wedding invitations come with RSVP cards where invitees can let the bride and groom know whether they are attending the couple's special day by checking either "Attending" or "Not Attending." However, sometimes RSVP cards are left blank so that the invitee can provide a personal response in writing. It is important to fill out an RSVP card -- whether or not you're going to the wedding -- so that the couple can plan the event with the correct number of guests in mind.

Read the wording of the wedding invitation to determine how formal or casual your RSVP response should be. For example, if the invitation says "The parents of Andy Williamson and Julie Fox formally invite you to their wedding of holy matrimony," you should respond in an equally formal way. A formal response should be something like the following:

Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Carter

Accept with pleasure

The invitation of

Mr. and Mrs. Williamson and Mr. and Mrs. Fox

For Sunday, the third of March

At 12 o'clock

Consider your relationship with the couple. If you are very close to the bride and groom and know they would appreciate a less formal response, try something like this:

Congrats, Andy and Julie! We'll be there -- can't wait!!

Cheers,

Matt and Alison

Write your RSVP response on scratch paper before you write it on the actual RSVP card. This will allow you to make mistakes and try various wordings before perfecting the final message.

Write your RSVP response using a black felt-tip or fountain pen. Take your time to write out the message to make sure you do not make any mistakes and space the words out in an attractive, uniform manner.

Place the RSVP card in the envelope provided in the invitation. Most wedding invitations will include a stamped envelope for cards, but if your invitation does not you will have to provide a stamp and envelope yourself. Mail the RSVP card back as soon as possible so the wedding couple and their parents can better plan the event.

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About the Author

Margaret Kay has worked as a freelance writer since 2009. She has worked as a contributor to "The Gonzaga Bulletin." Kay has recently completed her Master of Theology in media ethics at the University of Edinburgh.