How to Calculate Your Gas Bill

Written by c. taylor
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How to Calculate Your Gas Bill
Calculating your gas bill requires adding a number of fees. (Gas flame on the kitchen gas-stove image by Peter Ivanov from Fotolia.com)

Your gas bill may appear incomprehensible at first, but when you break it down, it becomes understandable. The charge for your gas unit is a simple multiplication of amount of gas used times the cost per volume of gas. That is fairly straightforward, but you may also be assessed taxes, delivery fees, billing fees and other such additions. The only way to know these charges is to consult a previous bill or call the gas company and ask for an explanation.

Skill level:
Easy

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Look at an old bill, or call the gas company, and find out the current rate and what kind of taxes, surcharges or other fees are added to the bill. These could be straight charges, or may be a per cent of usage.

  2. 2

    Look on your current bill and find the current usage. You can also estimate what you think your usage will be, based on past experience. This will give you the opportunity to estimate your bill before it arrives. This might be in units of cubic feet, therms or British thermal units. Because the rate will most likely be in the same units, you do not need to worry about conversions.

  3. 3

    Multiply your current or expected consumption by the rate. In the example, if you are charged 35 cents per unit, and you consumed 30 units, you are charged £6.80 for the gas itself.

  4. 4

    Add any straight fees, such as billing fees or customer charges. As an example, if the gas company charges £3 to bill you, your total is now £10.0.

  5. 5

    Divide any per cent charges, such as taxes, by 100 to convert it into decimal format, and then multiply that by the charge for gas. Add this result to the total. In the example, if you are charged a 3 per cent state tax and an 8 per cent municipal tax, you are charged an additional 32 cents for state taxes and 84 cents for city tax. Therefore, your total bill will be £10.80.

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