How to paint 3 colors around a room & have each color bleed into the other color

Written by emma nichols
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How to paint 3 colors around a room & have each color bleed into the other color
You can use the ombre effect to bleed three colours or shades of paint to make a room look more interesting. (man painting the wall image by timur1970 from Fotolia.com)

When painting a room, an interesting way to spice it up is to paint the walls more than one colour. Some people choose to paint each wall a different colour, but you also can put several colours on one wall and bleed the colours together to create an ombre effect. You can use three shades of one colour, going from dark to light, or three colours that look nice together. The ombre effect makes the colours look as if they are fading into each other. You can easily achieve this effect by using a dry paintbrush and moist sponge to blend the colours together.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • 3 buckets of different coloured paint
  • Acrylic glazing liquid
  • 3 mixing containers
  • 3 paint rollers and trays
  • 1 paintbrush
  • Sponge
  • Rag
  • Chalk

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Draw two straight lines across the walls where you want the colours to bleed together using the chalk.

  2. 2

    Mix each bucket of paint with acrylic glazing liquid in separate mixing containers. The mixes should be one part paint and three parts glaze. The glaze keeps the paint from drying immediately to allow you to blend the colours.

  3. 3

    Paint the first colour on the highest section using the roller and tray until you reach about 6 inches above the line.

  4. 4

    Paint the second colour in the middle section, from about 6 inches below the line to 6 inches above the second line using a different paint roller and tray.

  5. 5

    Paint diagonal lines and crosshatches in the unpainted section using a dry paintbrush by stroking through the lower few inches of paint in the first section and the upper few inches of paint in the middle section. Only one paintbrush is necessary since its purpose is to bring the colours closer to bleed. Wipe the paintbrush with a rag occasionally to keep paint from clumping in the bristles. Clean the paintbrush after use.

  6. 6

    Rub the crosshatched sections of paint together so they meet at the chalk line using a damp sponge to create a "bleeding" effect. Rinse the sponge.

  7. 7

    Paint the lower section, starting 6 inches below the second line, to the floor or baseboard, using another roller and tray.

  8. 8

    Paint diagonal lines and crosshatches, again using the dry paintbrush, in the unpainted section by stroking through paint from the lower few inches of the middle section and upper few inches of the lower section. Wipe the paintbrush with a rag occasionally to keep paint from clumping in the bristles. Clean the paintbrush after use.

  9. 9

    Rub the crosshatched sections of paint together so they meet at the chalk line using the damp sponge.

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