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How should I set the EQ for my bass guitar amp?

Updated July 20, 2017

In order to achieve a bass tone from your amplifier that fits your style of music, you must know how to properly set the EQ on your bass amp. Each bass amplifier is different, but many have the same basic controls. There are typically two types of equalisers on bass amps. Some amplifiers have "Low," "Mid" and "High" controls whereas other amplifiers have a graphic equaliser. Graphic equalisers allow you to select different frequency bands to cut or boost, giving you more tone shaping control over your amp.

Turn down the "Low" or "Bass" control on your bass guitar amp to add clarity to your bass tone by removing some of its low end. If your bass amp has a graphic equaliser, turn down the frequencies below 80 Hz to achieve this effect.

Turn up the "Low" or "Bass" control on your bass guitar amp to add "fatness" and "body" to your bass tone. If your bass amp has a graphic equaliser, turn up the frequency bands nearest to 80 Hz.

Turn up the "Mid" control on your bass guitar amp to create a more aggressive bass tone. If your bass amp has a graphic equaliser, turn up the frequency bands ranging from 300 Hz to 900 Hz.

Turn down the "Mid" control on your bass guitar amp to create a more mellow sounding bass tone. If your bass amp has a graphic equaliser, turn down the frequency bands ranging from 300 Hz to 900 Hz.

Turn up the "High" or "Treble" control on your bass guitar amp to add more treble to a dull sounding bass tone. If your bass amp has a graphic equaliser, turn up the frequency bands ranging from 5 kHz to 9 kHz.

Turn down the "High" or "Treble" control on your bass guitar amp if your bass tone sounds harsh because of excessive high frequencies. If your bass amp has a graphic equaliser, turn down the frequency bands ranging from 5 kHz to 9 kHz.

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About the Author

Wesley DeBoy has been a writer since 2004. He has a variety of arts and entertainment articles published on various websites. DeBoy specializes in writing about professional audio, music and computer technology. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in telecommunications production from Ball State University.