Step-by-Step Introduction on how to Make a Finger Joint

Written by cameron easey
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The finger joint is a type of cut that is made into the edge of two pieces of wood. This is done to create a box shape, such as that used in the construction of a drawer. When the fingers are joined together you will create a 90 degree angle. You can create finder joints by using a standard table saw. To do this, you will need to build a jig for cutting the finder joints out of the wood.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • Table saw
  • Tape measure
  • Dado set
  • Scrap wood
  • Pencil

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Take off the existing saw blade and attach the dado set to the table saw.

  2. 2

    Use a tape measure to measure the width of the boards to be cut and set the width of the dado set to this measurement. This will be the length of the finger joints.

  3. 3

    Turn on the table saw and make a cut into the middle of a scrap piece of wood. Measure away from the cut for the width of the dado set. Make a mark with the pencil. Make a second cut into the wood.

  4. 4

    Measure and cut a small peg that is the width of the dado set. Insert the peg into the first cut that you made. This is the jig that you will use to cut the finger joints.

  5. 5

    Place the board to cut against the peg and align the second cut with the dado blade. Set the guide bar on the table saw to the position of the second cut on the wood.

  6. 6

    Turn on the table saw and cut a corner from the wood. Slide the cut corner over the peg, and then make a second cut.

  7. 7

    Set the notch in the wood over the peg to make the next cut. Continue this step until you have finished cutting the fingers.

Tips and warnings

  • The peg in the wood acts as a spacer to cut each finder the exact same size.

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