How to Install Vinyl Fence on a Curve

Written by dan falk
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Installing a vinyl fence along a curve will consist of attaching a number of the rails to the posts at an angle other than 90 degrees; bending the fence in this manner is the best way to follow a curved pattern. The method that is used for this will depend on the type of fence system, specifically how its rails are mounted or attached to the post (this would usually be either angle or bracket). One method of doing this, outlined below, is to attach a small piece of wood and vinyl rail between the fence rail and post. Complete this step before the posts are cemented.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • Vinyl rail
  • Triangular shaped wood wedge
  • End cap
  • Bracket or angle
  • 2-inch screws
  • Drill
  • Measuring tape and protractor
  • Radial arm saw, or chop saw with a medium to fine tooth blade
  • Safety goggles

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Instructions

    Install Vinyl Fence on a Curve

  1. 1

    Measure the length of the rail that will be placed between the two posts; include room for expansion and contraction. Be sure to change from post centre to centre measurement to bracket/fastener centre to centre measurement. A general rule of thumb is to allow ½ inch between rails for expansion and ¼ inch between clips or fasteners to allow for contraction; however, check your manufacturer's manual to get the exact requirements.

  2. 2

    Lay the vinyl rail over the wood wedge. Measure and mark the desired angle, then cut along this mark through both the vinyl rail and wood wedge at the same time.

  3. 3

    Attach the end cap to the wood wedge.

  4. 4

    Pre-drill the post.

  5. 5

    Place the bracket on top of the end cap, and attach the vinyl rail to the wood wedge by screwing the screws through the bracket, edge cap, and wood wedge into the post. Be sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions exactly for attaching the bracket or particular type of fastener, including exact measurements and spacing to allow for expansion and contraction.

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