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How to Cook on a George Foreman Grill

Updated April 17, 2017

The George Foreman Lean Mean Fat-Reducing Grilling Machine is an electric home grill that eliminates a lot of the excess fat that others retain. It has two grooved grilling plates that cause heated grease to escape from the food and drain, rather than soak back in. Whether you want to make a quick toasted sandwich or a full steak dinner, the George Foreman Lean Mean Fat-Reducing Grilling Machine can be used with minimal effort.

Place a silicone heat mat on the counter and set the grilling machine on top of the mat. Wipe the upper and lower heating elements with a damp dish towel to remove any dust or dirt.

Plug your grilling machine into an outlet and let it preheat for five minutes. Keep the lid closed while the machine is preheating. This will prevent steam escaping.

Lift the lid of the grilling machine with a pot holder and set your food on the lower grill plate. Close the lid and cook until ready. Cooking times will vary with each dish you make, so stay near the machine while it is in operation.

Lift the top of the grill with a pot holder. Lift the food off the grill plate with the spatula that comes with the grill. Have a plate next to your grill so food can be transferred easily.

Unplug the grilling machine and let it cool. Empty the dripping pan of fat collected during cooking. Wipe the grill before putting it away.

Tip

To determine specific cooking times for various foods, read the instructions included with your George Foreman grill.

Warning

Do not use your George Foreman Lean Mean Fat-Reducing Grilling Machine for any purpose other than cooking food.

Things You'll Need

  • George Foreman Lean Mean Fat-Reducing Grilling Machine
  • Silicone heat mat
  • Dish towel
  • Pot holder
  • Spatula
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About the Author

Leah Perry has been writing articles, product descriptions and content since 2006 for websites like My Dear Child, Modular Kitchen Cabinets and On Track Lighting. The subjects of her works span topics from children to home and garden, home improvement, sewing and cooking.