How to Use a Microphone With Guitar Rig 2

Written by gregory dougherty
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How to Use a Microphone With Guitar Rig 2
Large diaphragm microphone (microphone 3 image by stefan Hudson from Fotolia.com)

Guitar Rig is a modular synthesizer designed by Native Instruments to emulate an array of guitar and bass amplifiers and effects. Guitar Rig's interface provides a user with a number of preset amplifier and effect combinations, as well as a list of components for a high degree of rig customisation. Both as a standalone device and a studio plug-in, Guitar Rig offers low latency, real-time signal processing for guitars, keyboards and microphones.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Satellite sound device (such as a Firepod or Mbox) with female XLR inputs
  • XLR cable
  • Microphone

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Open your computer's control panel and access your audio settings. Switch your playback device from your CPU's sound card to your satellite audio device.

  2. 2

    Run Guitar Rig as a standalone device. The Guitar Rig interface will open as a window on your desktop.

  3. 3

    Bring up Guitar Rig's "File" drop-down menu and scroll down to "Audio and MIDI Setting." Click on this to bring up an "Audio Setup" window with "Soundcard," "Routing" and "MIDI" tabs.

  4. 4

    Access the "Output Device" drop-down menu under the Audio Setup tab. The "Output Device" menu will provide you with a list of possible device options; choose your XLR-capable satellite as your output device.

  5. 5

    Open the "Routing" tab. You will have the option to choose either an "Inputs" or "Outputs" tab; select "Inputs." In this window you will have a grid that allows you to pair Guitar Rig with the input channels of your satellite audio device. Select the channel that you intend on using with your microphone.

Tips and warnings

  • Guitar Rig can also be used as a VST, DXi, RTAS or AU studio plug-in. In a studio environment, Guitar Rig can be used as an effects unit on either MIDI or WAV tracks.

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