How to rasterize & create outlines in illustrator

Written by chris hoke
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How to rasterize & create outlines in illustrator
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Adobe Illustrator is a vector graphics program that can be used to create graphics with lines, arcs and shapes, which are all stored as scalable mathematical values. Rasterising objects in Adobe Illustrator refers to converting the mathematical values of the object into a nonmathematical pixel-based (raster) object. This can be done to create a pixelated effect or to enable you to transfer the object to a raster-based graphics program. You can also create an outline of the object, which is helpful for editing the anchor points of text or creating an outlined effect for objects and shapes.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Instructions

    Rasterise

  1. 1

    Launch Adobe Illustrator and open a vector graphics file.

  2. 2

    Press the "V" key on your keyboard to select the "Selection Tool."

  3. 3

    Click (or click and drag) to highlight a line, shape, object or group.

  4. 4

    Click the "Object" menu at the top of the program window, then click to select "Rasterize" to convert the selected vector object into a raster object.

    Create Outline

  1. 1

    Launch Adobe Illustrator and open a vector graphic file.

  2. 2

    Click (or click and drag) to select a vector text object in the Adobe Illustrator artboard.

  3. 3

    Click the "Type" menu and choose "Create Outlines" to edit the text as an object.

  4. 4

    Click to select an object, then click the "Object" menu. Click "Path" and "Outline Stroke" to create an outline of the vector object.

  5. 5

    Click the "Fill" colour and set to "None," then set the "Stroke" colour to black and the stroke width to "1 pt" to create an outline of the object's strokes.

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