How to Paint Raindrops

Written by diana prince
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How to Paint Raindrops
Paint realistic-looking raindrops with basic art supplies. (summer rain image by Alison Bowden from Fotolia.com)

Raindrops can add a natural and interesting effect to a piece of artwork. The anatomy of a raindrop changes between the time it falls and once it lands on an object. Although painting raindrops may seem challenging, it's actually fairly simple and straightforward. You can paint either style of raindrop and make it look realistic, and all you need are a few basic art supplies.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • 1 container light blue acrylic paint
  • 1 container white acrylic paint
  • Small paintbrush
  • Small stiff brush
  • Art paper or canvas
  • 1 cup of water
  • Paper towel

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Open a container of light-blue acrylic paint.

  2. 2

    Dip a paintbrush into the paint to coat the bristles, and rub the excess off onto the sides of the paint container. Raindrops are small, delicate shapes and too much paint on the brush will make it difficult to shape each drop.

  3. 3

    Press the tip of the paintbrush lightly where you want the top of the raindrop to start,on a piece of art paper, canvas or other medium you're working on. Move the brush down and then out and around slowly, creating a half-balloon shape with the paint.

  4. 4

    Repeat this stroke moving in the opposite direction to create the other side of the raindrop. Your paint line should start at the tip of the raindrop and end at the bottom, resulting in a complete raindrop shape.

  5. 5

    Colour in the centre of the raindrop with blue paint, and wait a few minutes for the paint to dry.

  6. 6

    Open a container of white acrylic paint.

  7. 7

    Dip a paintbrush into the paint to coat the bristles, and rub the excess off on the side of the paint container.

  8. 8

    Paint a small arc just above the bottom right curve on the raindrop. This creates natural highlighting and adds realism.

  9. 9

    Repeat this process to make the desired number of raindrops.

  1. 1

    Open a container of acrylic paint in the colour of the item the raindrop has fallen on; if you want to paint a fallen raindrop on a leaf, choose green paint, if you want to paint a fallen raindrop on a piece of cement, choose grey paint, and so on. A raindrop appears slightly bluish in colour while falling, but is clear and appears the colour of what is underneath of it after it lands on any object.

  2. 2

    Dip a paintbrush into the paint to coat the bristles, and rub the excess off onto the sides of the paint container.

  3. 3

    Press the tip of the paintbrush lightly where you want the top of the raindrop to start on a piece of art paper, canvas or other medium you're working on and create an oblong shape.

  4. 4

    Colour in the centre of the raindrop lightly with paint, and wait a few minutes for the paint to dry.

  5. 5

    Paint a shadow underneath the raindrop with the same colour of paint, going over the same section a few times to make the paint darker and create shadowing. The cast shadow for a raindrop should be directly underneath the drop, the same width and about half the length, darkest directly underneath the bottom curve of the raindrop. Wait for the paint to dry completely.

  6. 6

    Scrape a small piece of paint off the top arc of the raindrop with a stiff brush. This creates natural highlighting and adds realism.

  7. 7

    Repeat this process to make the desired number of raindrops.

Tips and warnings

  • You can add a small amount of black paint to your paint for shadowing. Try a few drops and continue adding one drop at a time until you reach the desired shade.

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