How to Mix a Clear Glaze for Paint

Written by jennifer gigantino
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How to Mix a Clear Glaze for Paint
Faux painting can be used to create an aged effect. (Light Green Faux Painted wall image by Jim Mills from Fotolia.com)

The term "faux painting" refers to a style of painting walls or fixtures that imitates a texture such as wood or terra cotta. The effect may be achieved with textured or smooth plaster, or with an oil- or water-based glaze. Both types of glaze create faux-finished walls that are smooth to the touch, though oil-based glazes tend to be a bit hardier. Water-based glazes are used for finishes that require a quick build-up of layers, whereas slow-drying oil-based glazes give a finisher more time to manipulate the finish.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Scumble glaze
  • Turpentine
  • Artist's oil paint (optional)
  • Eggshell paint (optional)
  • Emulsion paint
  • Water-based emulsion glaze
  • Acrylic paint (optional)
  • Colour board

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Mix the scumble glaze with an approximately equal amount of turpentine.

  2. 2

    If you want a thicker consistency, tint the glaze to your desired colour with eggshell paint. If you want your glaze to be thinner, use artist's oil paint (from a tube).

  3. 3

    If desired, thin the glaze further with more turpentine, or thicken it with more scumble glaze.

  4. 4

    Test the glaze on a colour board and adjust as necessary.

  1. 1

    Mix a water-based emulsion paint with a water-based emulsion glaze to your desired clarity and consistency.

  2. 2

    If desired, alter the colour with acrylic paints.

  3. 3

    Test the glaze on a colour board and adjust as needed.

Tips and warnings

  • A quart of glaze will cover an average 9-by-12 room. Complex, layered finishes may require a gallon.

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