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How to Remove Watermarks on Teak Furniture

Teak wood naturally produces oil that provides added protection to the wood, making it a popular choice for outdoor furniture. Even though teak wood is durable, you can still damage it with carelessness. As with any other type of wood, excess moisture will leave watermarks on the teak furniture. An action as simple as placing a glass on the teak furniture without using a coaster can leave an unsightly water ring on the wood. Fortunately, there are several methods that will remove the watermarks and restore the look of your teak furniture.

Preheat an iron on a medium heat setting for several minutes. Turn the iron's steam capabilities off. Lay a white cotton towel over the watermarks.

Rub the iron over the towel for several seconds. Lift the towel up and examine the watermarks. Place the towel back over the marks and continue rubbing with the iron if the watermarks are still visible.

Repeat Step 2 until the watermarks are no longer visible on the teak furniture. Polish and buff the furniture as you normally would.

Fill a small bowl with cigarette ash. Add a drop of olive oil at a time until you have a paste. Spread the paste over the watermark until it is completely covered.

Dampen a sponge with cool water. Rub the paste into the wood with the damp sponge. Rub for several seconds.

Wipe the teak furniture clean with a damp cloth. Repeat the process until the watermarks are no longer present on the wood.

Dip 000 steel wool into wood wax and rub the watermark for several seconds. Continue rubbing until the marks are gone. Continue with the remaining steps if the watermarks remain.

Wipe the watermarks gently with a fine piece of sandpaper. Dip 00 steel wool into white spirit. Gently rub the watermarks with the steel wood. Rub with the wood grain for several seconds.

Stain the area of the teak furniture with wood stain that matches the surrounding wood. Let the teak wood dry before waxing and buffing the furniture as you normally would.

Things You'll Need

  • Iron
  • White cotton towel
  • Small bowl
  • Cigarette ash
  • Olive oil
  • Sponge
  • Cloth
  • 000 steel wool
  • Wood wax
  • Fine piece of sandpaper
  • 00 steel wool
  • White spirit
  • Wood stain
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About the Author

Amanda Flanigan began writing professionally in 2007. Flanigan has written for various publications, including WV Living and American Craft Council, and has published several eBooks on craft and garden-related subjects. Flanigan completed two writing courses at Pierpont Community and Technical College.