How to tie a cub scout neckerchief

Written by josh airman
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How to tie a cub scout neckerchief
The Boy Scouts of America were established in Washington, D.C., in 1910. (cub scouts shooting bb guns image by pixelcarpenter from Fotolia.com)

The neckerchief component to the scouting uniform dates back to the original uniform concept proposed by the founder of scouting, Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell. Originally appearing in 1917 as an optional uniform item in the scouting supply catalogue, Supply Division, the neckerchief became mandatory in 1920. The neckerchief would remain a mandatory piece of the scouting uniform until the 1980s. Neckerchiefs are now earned by scouts and worn according to scouting unit decree. Cub Scout neckerchiefs are coloured differently to indicate a scout's rank in scouting.

Skill level:
Easy

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Place the neckerchief on a flat surface.

  2. 2

    Orient the neckerchief so that the corner containing the scouting emblem is facing you.

  3. 3

    Fold a one-inch segment of the top fabric under the neckerchief.

  4. 4

    Continue to fold the neckerchief toward you until six inches of fabric remain unfolded.

  5. 5

    Place the neckerchief with the emblem facing out from the back of the wearer.

  6. 6

    Pull the ends of the neckerchief over or under the collar of the uniform so that it conforms to your scouting unit regulations.

  7. 7

    Hold the neckerchief ends tightly together and guide them through the neckerchief slide.

  8. 8

    Pull the neckerchief slide up to the centre of neckline so that the neckerchief fits securely.

Tips and warnings

  • Check with your scouting unit leader if you are not sure about neckerchief placement regulations.
  • A tightly folded neckerchief will help to ensure that your uniform is neatly put together.

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