DISCOVER
×

How to Kill Pantry Moths With Home Remedies

Updated August 03, 2018

Pantry moths, also known as Indian meal moths, are brownish-red in colour with a wing span just under 1 inch. These moths cause much damage in homes when they munch on grains, flours, fruits and even pet food. If your pantry is plagued with pantry moths, you must take action immediately. One female pantry moth can lay between 100 and 300 eggs, making your food even more susceptible once those eggs hatch. Home remedies are just as effective at controlling pantry moths as chemical ones.

Remove all food that is infested with pantry moths and dispose of it in sealed trash bags.

Take all uninfested food out of your pantry or cabinet shelves. Vacuum the shelves and transfer the uninfested food to sealed plastic containers or glass jars.

Wash all surfaces in the pantry and in the cabinets where you were storing the food. Use hot water and dish soap. This will remove any pantry moth eggs so that they don't have a chance to hatch.

Lay out either bay leaves or lemon peels on the shelves in your pantry or food cabinet. You can also sprinkle cinnamon, black pepper or coriander on the shelves. These all-natural ingredients repel pantry moths and keep them from reinfesting your food.

Paint a 1/2 gallon milk jug yellow. The website Surf in the Spirit states that moths are attracted to the colour yellow. Pour 1 cup of molasses and 2 cups of vinegar in the milk jug and set it out without the cap to trap any remaining pantry moths.

Tip

Pheromone sticky traps are also an option as they are all-natural and pesticide free. Always store flour, grains and pet foods in sealed containers to prevent another pantry moth infestation in the future.

Warning

Plastic zipper bags will not stop pantry moths. You must use sealed plastic containers, metal jars or glass jars.

Things You'll Need

  • Garbage bags
  • Vacuum
  • Sealed plastic containers or glass jars
  • Dish soap
  • Bay leaves or lemon peels
  • Cinnamon, black pepper or coriander
  • 1/2 gallon milk jug
  • Yellow paint
  • 1 cup molasses
  • 2 cups vinegar
Cite this Article A tool to create a citation to reference this article Cite this Article

About the Author

Alicia Bodine has been a professional writer for 13 years. She has produced thousands of articles for online publications such as Demand Studios, GoBankingRates and WiseGeek. Bodine is passionate about gardening, travel, education and finance. She has received awards for being a top content producer.