How to Cut a Perfect Circle in Wood Using a Jigsaw

Written by lauren vork
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Circular wooden cutouts are a shape often needed for woodworking designs and crafts, but they can be difficult to create using flat saw blades better suited for cutting straight lines. In order to cut out a perfect wooden circle using a jigsaw, use an approach that utilises the saw's ability to cut straight lines rather than fighting against this tendency.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • Wood
  • Pencil
  • Compass, string or circle pattern
  • Ruler
  • Jigsaw
  • Work bench
  • Wood clamps
  • Sandpaper
  • Disc sander

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Draw a perfect circle in pencil on a piece of wood. Use a compass, a pencil on a length of string or trace a circle pattern.

  2. 2

    Use a ruler to draw four lines around the circle shape. Create a square around the circle whose four walls just barely touch edges of the circle at their widest.

  3. 3

    Clamp the wood to the edge of the bench and cut along the straight lines with the jigsaw. This will create a wooden square with a circle circumscribed inside it.

  4. 4

    Create new straight lines with the ruler. Make these lines trim away the four corners of the square and barely touch the edges of the circle. Cut along these lines.

  5. 5

    Repeat the process of trimming the circle's corners with lines. This time, cut away most of the material that forms the eight pointy sections still attached to the circle shape. After this, make more lines and cut again, each time getting closer to the circle's edge. The larger the circle is, the more lines you will cut before you have a completed circle.

  6. 6

    Sand the edges of the circle. Sand by hand or with a disc sander to remove the slight straight edges that still remain on your circle.

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