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How to remove grease stains out of satin

Updated April 17, 2017

Satin is a frequent choice for wedding dresses, ball gowns and other fancy apparel. In many cases the garment is white or light-coloured, increasing the visibility of grease stains. Most grease stains are from car door hinges and appear near the lower edges of items. Prompt treatment of stains greatly increases the chances of removing the stain completely.

Place a layer of absorbent white material, such as paper towels or cloths, on a flat surface.

Place the stained area of the garment over the absorbent material, with the stained area facing down.

Soak a second white cloth with heavy-duty detergent or pre-treatment spray product.

Blot the stain gently from the wrong side with the detergent or pre-treatment spray-soaked cloth. Work from the outside of the stain toward the centre to avoid spreading the stain.

Move the stained area of the fabric to a clean place on the absorbent cloth beneath the stain so a clean area can absorb the stain. Use a clean area of the cloth saturated with cleaning solution as well to avoid further spreading the stain.

Blot the area with a clean cloth dipped in water to remove any ring left by the cleaning solutions. Use cool to tepid water.

Wash the item, if washable, in the warmest water the garment can tolerate to remove any residue. Check the garment for any residual stains before drying. Drying will set most stains. If the stain remains, repeat the above sponging treatment.

Tip

Read the fabric care label on the garment to determine the water temperature for washing. Acetate satin can tolerate a warm water wash while silk satin should be washed only in cold water. If in doubt, wash the item in cold water.

Warning

Avoid rubbing the stain as it can roughen the surface of the satin.

Things You'll Need

  • Paper towels or white cloths
  • Heavy-duty washing powder or spray pre-treatment product
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About the Author

Located in south-central Wisconsin, Helen Sterling is a freelance writer who has been writing online since 2004. Sterling's background is in human resources where she has written and edited numerous policy and procedure manuals for both corporate and manufacturing companies. She publishes articles on crafts for various websites and enjoys making complex projects easy to understand. Sterling also owns a jewelry-design business.