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How to Make a Cracked Mirror Guitar

Updated April 17, 2017

Making a cracked mirror guitar is a lengthy process. However, the end results can be quite spectacular, producing a unique and individual looking guitar. Creating the cracked mirror effect takes patience and a working knowledge of tools such as glass cutters and routers. It is important to allow a couple of days of solid working to finish the project -- many parts of the process, such as cutting the pieces of mirrored glass, can take a long time.

Place the guitar onto the paper. Use the pencil to trace the outline of the body of the guitar. Cut the outline out. This will serve as the template for the mirror.

Place the mirror on the router and position the paper template on top of the glass. Use protective goggles. Using the router, carefully cut around the template. Once the routing is completed, the mirror should be in the same shape as the guitar body.

Continue to use protective goggles. Use a glass cutter to cut the mirror into pieces and lay them flat, recreating the shape of the guitar. Cut them free-form, so as to give the final product the "cracked mirror" look.

Lay masking tape over any crevices or any cavities in the guitar body, such as the pickup selector. This prevents the holes from becoming clogged with glue. Apply the glue to the body of the guitar and to the reverse side of the mirror pieces. Carefully lay the mirror shards on the guitar body. Leave overnight to set.

Use the sander to round off any sharp edges on the mirrored pieces.

Warning

The edges on the mirrored pieces can be very sharp. Always take extra precautions such as wearing work gloves when working with these materials.

Things You'll Need

  • Guitar
  • Paper
  • Pencil
  • Masking tape
  • Router
  • Mirror
  • Strong epoxy glue
  • Glass cutter
  • Scissors
  • Sander
  • Work gloves
  • Goggles
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About the Author

Rina Shah is a law student with degrees in psychology and business administration from the University of Texas and a Master of Science from the London School of Economics. She has worked in law, nonprofits, information technology and teaching. Shah has over five years of experience writing for various purposes on the job and more than 10 years of academic writing.