How to identify numbers on a debit card

Written by tim burris
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How to identify numbers on a debit card
Know what your card numbers mean. (credit card image by feisty from Fotolia.com)

There are several sets of numbers on both debit or credit cards, which share the same characteristics. Each set of numbers has a specific purpose, such as to identify your account number, the identity of the card issuer and to prevent others who access your account number from making unauthorised purchases. All the numbers shown on your debit or credit card should be shared sparingly. If these numbers fall into the wrong hands your current account could be in jeopardy, as well as your personal information and credit history. An understanding of where the numbers are and what they mean could help keep you safe.

Skill level:
Easy

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Look at the string of digits on the face of your debit card. Visa and Mastercard, the most common issuers of debit and credit cards, have 16 digits. These digits represent the card issuer and your specific account number.

    How to identify numbers on a debit card
    Your account number and type are printed on the card. (credit card image by jimcox40 from Fotolia.com)
  2. 2

    Look at the first two digits. For both Visa and Mastecard the first digit identifies the card issuer; "4" is Visa and "5" is Mastercard.

    How to identify numbers on a debit card
    The first digit characterises the type of your card. (Gold credit card image by patrimonio designs from Fotolia.com)
  3. 3

    The remainder of the digits are to identify which specific bank issued the card, as well as your specific account number and account type. The account type is defined by the card issuer.

    How to identify numbers on a debit card
    Do you have a regular, gold or platinum card? (card image by Andrii IURLOV from Fotolia.com)
  4. 4

    Keep your debit and credit cards safe by not sharing your card number with anyone but an authorised merchant. Card numbers can be stolen and used easily. Protect yourself.

    How to identify numbers on a debit card
    Keep your card number safe. (safe image by goce risteski from Fotolia.com)
  1. 1

    Take a look at the flip side of your debit or credit card. There is one very important number you need to know about. The CVV2 number, or security code number, is located on the back of most cards.

    How to identify numbers on a debit card
    The security code number is on the back of most cards. (Credit card image by amlet from Fotolia.com)
  2. 2

    Give this number only to an authorised retail merchant. This three-digit number is used by merchants as a way to verify that the cardholder is present at the purchase. If a card number is stolen, it is less likely that the thief would have this information, thus it is a way to protect both you and the merchant from fraudulent purchases.

    How to identify numbers on a debit card
    The CVV2 number keeps you and the merchant safe. (a man and a woman with money and credit cards image by Sergii Shalimov from Fotolia.com)
  3. 3

    Beware of scams asking for the security code number. There are documented cases of callers pretending to be card security representatives. The call may seem legitimate, but always contact your card issuer before giving out any sensitive information.

    How to identify numbers on a debit card
    Beware of fraud and protect your account information. (bank statment and cut credit card image by Warren Millar from Fotolia.com)

Tips and warnings

  • Keep your debit and credit card information safe by dealing only with authorised retail merchants.
  • Never give your personal information out over the telephone without verifying that it truly is your card issuer.

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