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How to improve bluetooth range

Updated February 21, 2017

Bluetooth technology allows electronic devices to communicate wirelessly. No longer must computers be connected via cables to printers or headsets to cell phones to work. Bluetooth uses small chips and receivers to allow the devices to "talk" to each other. After a connection is established between the devices, Bluetooth creates a wireless network to accomplish tasks. This widespread technology is relatively inexpensive and included in most laptops, cell phones and other consumer electronics. But Bluetooth is limited by range problems, and most devices must be no more than 30 feet apart to work. Obstacles, such as walls, and interference from other devices affect Bluetooth's range.

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Minimise as many large obstacles as possible between the Bluetooth-connected devices. Range improves if, for example, there are fewer walls between the devices. Range also is affected by large furniture between devices, so move the electronics or rearrange furniture to improve performance.

Purchase a Bluetooth antenna extension, also known as Bluetooth booster, at an electronics store. The extender, which plugs into Bluetooth-enabled equipment, boosts Bluetooth devices' signals, greatly increasing the range beyond the standard 30 feet. The total extension depends on the individual booster's power.

Turn off or move away from competing wireless signals, such as Wi-Fi connections. Wi-Fi works like Bluetooth, but is much stronger. The signals can disrupt Bluetooth connections, shortening the Bluetooth's range.

Warning

Opening your computer or electronic device to install an internal Bluetooth antenna likely will void the product's warranty.

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Things You'll Need

  • Bluetooth antenna extension

About the Author

Tallulah Philange has worked as a journalist since 2003. Her work has appeared in the "Princeton (N.J.) Packet," "Destinations" magazine and in higher education publications. She also has edited and produced online content for those publications. Philange holds a Bachelor of Arts in print journalism from American University and a Master of Arts in communication, culture and technology from Georgetown University.

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