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How to care for a zinc-topped table

Updated April 17, 2017

Zinc-topped tables offer one significant benefit to consumers, along with their classic appearance: they are non-porous, meaning they are easy to clean and will not harbour food-borne bacteria. Similar to pewter in colour, zinc can be polished to retain its shine or left unpolished to achieve a blue-toned patina for a more rustic look. These striking differences make zinc a versatile material for a tabletop in a variety of different settings and decor styles.

Clean your table regularly with a mixture of mild soap and water. Wiping your table down at the end of the day or after use is often enough to maintain their original appearance and adequate cleanliness.

Do not use your table for cutting or chopping under any circumstances. Zinc is softer than many materials, such as stainless steel, marble and granite, typically used for tabletops, and zinc can easily be damaged by vigorous chopping. Use a clean wooden, glass or plastic cutting board instead if you have limited space and need to use the table for food preparation.

Avoid putting hot items such as pots and pans or warmed serving dishes directly on the table. Zinc has a melting point of about 149 degrees Celsius, so use hotplates, towels or simply double up your plates before serving if you need to.

Apply a layer of zinc-safe wax polish and a clean rag to your table as needed. Polish a zinc-topped table about as much as you would polish solid wood furniture. However, you may need to polish your table more often if you use the table daily, depending on your desired appearance.

Tip

Try to keep excess water and liquid off your table as much as possible. Zinc can be stained, and though it can be fixed in some cases, acidic liquids such as wine, beer or orange juice may damage the finish permanently if left for too long. If there is a spill on the table, wipe the liquid off and clean the table with a mild soap and water solution as soon as possible.

Things You'll Need

  • Soap and water cleaning solution
  • Cutting board
  • Hotplates or potholders
  • Kitchen towels
  • Zinc-safe wax polish
  • Clean rag
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About the Author

Christopher Godwin is a freelance writer from Los Angeles. He spent his formative years as a chef and bartender crafting signature dishes and cocktails as the head of an upscale catering firm. He has since ventured into sharing original creations and expertise with the public. Godwin has published poetry, fiction and nonfiction in publications like "Spork Magazine," "Cold Mountain Review" and "From Abalone To Zest."