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How to Replace the Ticking On a Down Pillow

Updated February 21, 2017

The outside cover on a pillow is called the ticking. Ticking fabric has a very high thread count and a tight weave to prevent the feathers from poking through. Purchase actual ticking fabric or a sturdy fabric with a thread count above 300. The only difficult part of replacing a ticking is transferring the feathers. Down is difficult to work with because the feathers fly everywhere, but a few simple steps can make the process easier.

Measure the length and width of the pillow from seam to seam. Add 1 inch to each of these measurements and cut two rectangles of fabric with these dimensions.

Place the right sides of the rectangles together and stitch around all the edges with a straight stitch and a half-inch seam allowance. Leave an 8-inch opening in one end for stuffing.

Sew a zigzag stitch in the seam allowance to finish the seam. Clip the corners and turn the ticking right-side out.

Place the old pillow and the new ticking in the large plastic bag. Cut a hole in the old ticking and transfer the down from the old pillow to the new ticking.

Remove the pillow and sew the opening closed. Pull the seam on each side of the opening to bring the edges of the opening together and machine-stitch close to the folds.

Tip

Cover the hose attachment on a vacuum cleaner with an old nylon stocking. Use it to remove the last of the feathers. Turn off any fans and shut any windows before you open the old pillow to prevent a draft from scattering the feathers.

Things You'll Need

  • Tape measure
  • Large clear plastic bag
  • Ticking fabric
  • Scissors
  • Sewing machine
  • Thread
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About the Author

Camela Bryan's first published article appeared in "Welcome Home" magazine in 1993. She wrote and published SAT preparation worksheets and is also a professional seamstress who has worked for a children's theater as a costume designer and in her own heirloom-sewing business. Bryan has a Bachelor of Science in chemical engineering from the University of Florida.