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How to follow airplane flights

Updated July 19, 2017

Waiting at the airport for flights to arrive can be a real hassle if there are any delays or cancellations. These days, you can follow an aeroplane flight online to find out everything from status of the journey to the average ground speed and type of aircraft in operation. In order to track a flight, have as much information as possible on hand, such as airline, flight number and destination.

Write down all the flight information. You will need the name of the airline and the flight number as well as the departure and arrival locations. It is also helpful to know the time of the flight. Once you have collected this information, you can start to follow the flight online.

Search on the airline's website. You can follow aeroplane flights by going to the home page of the airline and clicking on "flight status." Enter in the date and flight number or just the arrival and departure cities to see results that include gate number, baggage claim area and status of the flight. Some airlines even offer notification of flights via e-mail or text message; signing up for notification of flight status can be done online through the airline website.

Use Flight Tracker. FlightView.com allows users to follow aeroplane flights online. You can see the ground speed, altitude, type of aircraft and time remaining until the flight ends, just as you would when flying yourself. Flights can also be tracked in real time for computers using a Microsoft platform; refreshing the browser is not required as it automatically updates itself.

Use FlightAware. This company was the first to offer free flight tracking for private and commercial air traffic back in 2005. Users can search for airline flights by operator, airport and aircraft type. Flight data, airport information, weather maps and even aviation news is available for viewing. Registering is free and members have the opportunity to see flight notes as well as have the history stored of regularly tracked flights.

Things You'll Need

  • Flight information
  • Internet access
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About the Author

Rachel Oakley has written professionally since 2003. She has worked as an editorial intern at "The Onion" newspaper and freelanced for the educational website Gigglepotz. She also worked as an editorial assistant in Australia, while completing college. Oakley holds a Bachelor of Arts in English and philosophy from the University of Adelaide, Australia.