How to Test an EGR Vacuum Solenoid

Written by sean farmer
  • Share
  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Pin
  • Email
How to Test an EGR Vacuum Solenoid
The vehicle's EGR valve controls the vehicle's emissions. (Auto Exhaust image by Digital Photique from Fotolia.com)

Your vehicles EGR valve is a crucial component in the vehicle's exhaust system. The EGR valve controls the amount of exhaust reintroduced into the engine, thus reducing the vehicles emissions. A failed EGR valve can cause decreased power and acceleration as well as lower fuel economy. This happens when the valve either does not open or remains open. You will need to know what type of EGR valve your vehicle has.

Skill level:
Moderate

Other People Are Reading

Things you need

  • Hand-held vacuum pump

Show MoreHide

Instructions

  1. 1

    Locate the EGR valve in your vehicle. It is usually found on the intake manifold.

  2. 2

    Disconnect the tube connected to the EGR valve's nipple.

  3. 3

    Connect the tube of the hand-held vacuum pump to the nipple of the EGR valve.

  4. 4

    Pump the hand held vacuum pump to around 5 or 6 inches-Hg. The pump should retain the same pressure. If it doesn't, the valve needs to be replaced.

  5. 5

    Start the vehicle. While the vehicle idles, start pumping up the hand-held vacuum pump. If the EGR valve is good, the engine should stall as you pump the vacuum.

  1. 1

    Locate the EGR valve in your vehicle. It is usually found on the intake manifold.

  2. 2

    Disconnect the tube from the EGR valve's nipple.

  3. 3

    Connect the hand-held vacuum tube to the EGR valve's nipple.

  4. 4

    Start the vehicle. Depress the accelerator until the engine reaches 2,000 rpms.

  5. 5

    Pump the hand-held vacuum pump and watch the rpms. The vehicle's rpms should drop about 100 rpms with each pump if the EGR valve is working properly.

  1. 1

    Locate the EGR valve in your vehicle. It is usually found on the intake manifold.

  2. 2

    Disconnect the tube from the EGR valve's nipple.

  3. 3

    Connect the hand-held vacuum pump to the EGR valve's nipple.

  4. 4

    Apply 5 to 6 inches-Hg by pumping the vacuum pump. The pump should retain the same vacuum if the EGR is working properly.

Tips and warnings

  • Integrated electronic/mechanical EGR valves should be checked by a mechanic or electrician who can perform a sweep test with a voltmeter.

Don't Miss

Filter:
  • All types
  • Articles
  • Slideshows
  • Videos
Sort:
  • Most relevant
  • Most popular
  • Most recent

No articles available

No slideshows available

No videos available

By using the eHow.co.uk site, you consent to the use of cookies. For more information, please see our Cookie policy.