How to fold paper money into a rose

Written by christina riopelle
  • Share
  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Pin
  • Email
How to fold paper money into a rose
Capture the beauty of a rose with origami currency. (gelbe rose - yellow rose image by Yvonne Baumann from Fotolia.com)

Delight a child with five five pound notes folded in the form of a rose, or present a graduate with a currency bouquet. Origami roses make both small and large monetary gifts dynamic. To make your own wilt-proof posies, start with a clean, crisp notes in the denominations of your choice. Alternatively, recycle refugees from damaged or discarded board games. Paper money provides a colourful, and more permanent, alternative to spendable cash.

Skill level:
Easy

Other People Are Reading

Things you need

  • 5 notes in any denomination
  • Wire cutters
  • Florist tape
  • Small trinket or piece of chocolate
  • Presentation box

Show MoreHide

Instructions

    Petals

  1. 1

    Fold the first petal. Determine which side of the note you would like displayed on the bottom, or back of the rose. Lay the note on a flat surface with the intended back facing down. Fold the note in half. The back will remain on the outside. Reinforce the crease with your finger nail.

  2. 2

    Open the note with the back side facing up. Do not attempt to eliminate the crease. Curl the four edges at an approximate 45 degree angle. Bend a hair grip open and wrap the edge around it. Roll the corners around a hair clip to achieve a round, tight curl. Unroll the curl or simply slide the pin out.

  3. 3

    Flip the note over so that the front faces up. Gently crease the bill lengthwise, but do not fold it in half. Pinch the crease from the bottom. Then, slightly crumple the bill into the shape of a bow tie or fan. Each of the two sides of the bow tie should point upwards at the edges and remain rounded or cuplike.

  4. 4

    While keeping the centre punched, work the two cups with your fingers to smooth out the bottoms.

  5. 5

    Put the note aside. Repeat the process with a fresh note three more times. This creates the four sets of petals needed for the rose.

    Bud

  1. 1

    Fold the last note in half the short way. The side previously chosen as the back should be facing in.

  2. 2

    Open the note, then gently curl, or cup it in your hand. It should cup or curl in the direction of the fold, but do not fold it hard. Gentle fold, but do not crease, the corners so that they touch and overlap. This should mimic the appearance of a closed rose bud. Open the "bud" once more. Crumple the middle and form into a bow tie shape, as in Section 1, Step 3.

  3. 3

    Bend a piece of wire, such as floral wire or a thin gauge hanger. Fold it in half. Slide the bill into the inner bend of the wire tightly. Wrap the wire underneath the note to secure it. Bend the wires with pliers so that the wires run parallel below the bud.

    Assembly

  1. 1

    Slide the first "petal" set underneath the bud. Push the second note as close below the "bud" note as possible. Twist the wire underneath the first set of petals to secure it, insuring that they securely cross.

  2. 2

    Add the additional petals, repeating Section 3, Step 4 for each "petal" note. When the final "petals" are in place, twist the ends of the wires together to form a stem.

  3. 3

    Unfurl the petals. Starting with the bottom set, arrange the edges. Unroll and work the edges with your fingers to creates a fully or partially opened rose.

  4. 4

    Embellish the rose. Snip leaves from a silk or plastic rose and adhere them to the origami rose with florist's tape. Do not use glue, as it renders the money unusable. Alternatively, place the rose in a jewellery box. Place a small, lightweight trinket inside the bud. Choose a tiny folded handwritten note or a piece of chocolate.

Don't Miss

Filter:
  • All types
  • Articles
  • Slideshows
  • Videos
Sort:
  • Most relevant
  • Most popular
  • Most recent

No articles available

No slideshows available

No videos available

By using the eHow.co.uk site, you consent to the use of cookies. For more information, please see our Cookie policy.