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How to Clean Bean Bag Toys

Bean bag toys have been a staple toy in households for many years. They typically come in the form of animals, people and other kid-friendly objects. Unlike traditional stuffed toys, they include small beads or pellets, often made from PVC. They have less stuffing inside, which gives each toy a floppier, squishier consistency. These toys are designed to be played with, but often are collected by hobby enthusiasts. For either purpose, these delicately crafted toys often need gentile cleaning to be rid of germs or to help a collector maintain the value of their collectable item.

Gently vacuum loose dirt or dust from your toy before using any wet cleaning techniques. This will help protect against the dirt smearing and potentially ruining your bean bag toy. Use a feather duster for a less dirty toy.

Dampen a soft washcloth with a small amount of warm water and antibacterial dish soap. Use a gentle and even stroke pattern to remove stains and harmful bacteria.

Rinse the soap off your washcloth and wipe away any soap residue that remains on the toy.

Allow your bean bag toy to air-dry indoors and away from direct sunlight to prevent the toy's colour from fading.

Tip

For collectors, protect your toy's tag with specially made plastic tag protectors before and after washing your toy. For bean bag toys with longer fur, use a small brush to help give the toy its original look and lustre.

Warning

Avoid laundering your bean bag toys. This can lead to a faster deterioration of the toy, which may cause the toy's beads or innards to release and bring about a possible choking hazard for a small child. Avoid forced drying techniques such as using a hair or laundry dryer, as this can cause your toy's material to shrink or distort. Avoid cleaning your bean bag toy with soap or detergent that contains bleach; this can cause the toy's colour to fade or bleed.

Things You'll Need

  • Vacuum cleaner with attachments
  • Feather duster (optional)
  • Soft wash cloth
  • Dish soap (non-bleach)
  • Plastic tag cover (optional)
  • Small hairbrush (optional)
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About the Author

Bryan Ordman is a film school graduate of Columbia College Chicago and has been working as a freelance writer since 2007. His primary focus while attending college was screenwriting. He has written in the past primarily as a film columnist but is now regular writer for eHow and Answerbag. Ordman obtained his Bachelor of Arts from Columbia College Chicago in 2008.