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How to Paint the Inside of a Dryer Drum

Updated February 21, 2017

You can paint the inside of a dryer drum as long as you choose the proper coating. Before you begin, consider that many dryer drums are composed of bare galvanised metal. Paint will not adhere to bare metallic surfaces unless they are conditioned with a special acidic primer. Once the drum is properly prepared, it will accept its new finish. Select a special heat-resistant appliance enamel, or the finish will not remain durable in the long run.

Unplug the dryer and ensure that it is cool.

Smooth old, chipping enamel by sanding it with 180-grit sandpaper.

Remove enamel chips and dust from the dryer, using sticky tackcloths.

Cover areas you do not want painted with masking paper and professional painter's tape.

Coat bare metal dryer drums with galvanised metal etching spray primer. Maintain an 8-inch distance between the drum and the spray nozzle as you apply. Leave the dryer door open and wait six hours for the etching primer to dry. Skip this step if the dryer drum is already painted.

Coat the dryer drum with heat-resistant appliance enamel spray paint. Maintain an 8-inch distance between the drum and the spray nozzle as you apply. Leave the dryer door open and wait a full day before using the dryer.

Tip

Put on a respirator before applying the primer and paint.

Warning

Do not paint directly over bare metal dryer drums, or the finish will peel. Do not use ordinary paints on a dryer drum, as they will not remain durable. Do not use ordinary primers on bare metal, or the final finish will chip.

Things You'll Need

  • 180-grit sandpaper
  • Tackcloths
  • Professional painter's tape
  • Masking paper
  • Galvanised metal etching spray primer
  • Heat-resistant appliance enamel spray paint
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About the Author

Ryan Lawrence is a freelance writer based in Boulder, Colorado. He has been writing professionally since 1999. He has 10 years of experience as a professional painting contractor. Lawrence writes for High Class Blogs and Yodle. He has a bachelor's degree in journalism and public relations with a minor in history from the University of Oklahoma.