How to Write a Letter of Job Termination

Written by samuel hamilton
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How to Write a Letter of Job Termination
Job terminations are often not as amicable as the encounter seen here. (la rencounter image by Yves Damin from Fotolia.com)

Terminating a job, whether you're the employee that is leaving or the employer that is letting somebody go, is always an uncomfortable task. In addition to the unpleasantries of meeting and discussing the job termination with an employee or boss, there is the added awkwardness of drafting formal and necessary letters of job termination. Whether you're an employee quitting a job or an employer firing someone, writing a letter of job termination requires you to tread lightly around the reasons for the job termination, while simultaneously wishing the best to the parting employee or to the organisation.

Skill level:
Easy

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Format your letter according to the standard, business letter format, with the date at the top of the page, followed by your address, followed by the inside address (company or boss's address), followed by your salutation (dear so-and-so), followed by the body of your letter, followed by a closing statement and finally ending with your signature block.

  2. 2

    Write a line or two emphasising how thankful you are for the experiences you gained from working with the company. It is important to leave companies on a good foot in case you need letters of recommendation or in case you ever reapply to the company.

  3. 3

    Identify the reasons for which you are terminating your employment with the company in the next couple of lines of the body. Highlight your reasons for leaving without belittling the company that you're leaving. For example, if you're going to a higher paying job, avoid saying, "I'm leaving for more money." Instead, consider phrasing a softer statement such as, "I'm exploring a new job opportunity with a greater possibility of advancement." Sometimes when so informed, your old job will start a bidding war for your employment, particularly if you've been an asset to the company.

  4. 4

    Close your letter with a brief and thoughtful statement simultaneously reflecting on your time with the company and wishing the company the best as you both part amicably. Again, the point is to leave a company on good terms in case you ever need to rely on them for future letters or jobs.

  5. 5

    Copy your letter to all necessary personnel who will handle your job status, including your direct supervisor, the Human Resources department, the Payroll department and so on.

  1. 1

    Format your letter according to the standard, business letter format as with the employee's letter. Start with the date at the top of the page, followed by your address, followed by the inside address (company or boss's address), followed by your salutation (dear so-and-so), followed by the body of your letter, followed by a closing statement and finally ending with your signature block.

  2. 2

    Write a line or two thanking the employee for his service. You may even consider highlighting specific projects or accomplishments which benefited your company that were spearheaded by the employee.

  3. 3

    Identify the specific reasons why you are terminating the employment of the letter's recipient. Not only is this valuable for your company's records and the employee's edification, in some cases it is legally required. In cases of gross incompetence or untoward office behaviour, soften the language so as to not create an insurmountable pock mark on the employee's record. For example, rather than writing, "You are hereby terminated because you stole office supplies," consider writing "Your services are hereby no longer required due to your mishandling of office equipment and supplies."

  4. 4

    Close your letter with well wishes and any and all additional post-job assistance you're willing to offer to the employee such as letters of recommendation or business contacts.

  5. 5

    Copy your letter to all necessary personnel who will handle the employee's job status, including your direct supervisor, the Human Resources department, the Payroll department and so on.

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