How to Split a Satellite Dish Signal to Use to Receivers

Written by marshal m. rosenthal
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How to Split a Satellite Dish Signal to Use to Receivers
(Comstock Images/Comstock/Getty Images)

A satellite dish uses LNB (low noise block amplifier) modules to receive a satellite signal from the overhead satellite. To increase the number of satellite feeds being received so that more than one satellite receiver can be used, split the satellite signal by adding a satellite multi-switch to the satellite set-up. You will also need additional coaxial cables and a few parts that can be purchased from a satellite supply store. An additional satellite receiver will also be needed.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • Dual LNB module
  • Satellite multi-switch
  • LNB add-on block
  • Phillips screwdriver
  • Coaxial cables, 3 feet long
  • Coaxial cable, 100 feet long
  • Plastic tie
  • Portable drill
  • 1-inch drill bit
  • Silicone sealant
  • TV
  • Coaxial adaptor
  • Second satellite receiver

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Loosen the screws on the side of the LNB module that is on the far end of the pole attached to the front of the satellite dish---use the Phillips screwdriver. Unscrew the coaxial cable connected to the coaxial output on the bottom of the LNB module.

  2. 2

    Screw the coaxial cable into one of the coaxial outputs on the satellite multi-switch. Place the satellite multi-switch against the bracket to which the satellite dish is attached. Affix the satellite multi-switch to the bracket with a plastic tie.

  3. 3

    Loosen the screws on the LNB add-on block with the Phillips screwdriver. Slide the bottom of the block onto the far end of the pole. Tighten the screws.

  4. 4

    Place the LNB module onto one of the two angled connectors on the block. Rotate the LNB module so that its plastic front faces toward the satellite dish. Tighten the screws. Loosen the screws on the side of the dual LNB module with the Phillips screwdriver. Place the dual LNB module on the other angled connector on the block. Rotate the dual LNB module so that it, too, is facing the satellite dish. Tighten the screws.

  5. 5

    Connect two 3-foot coaxial cables between the two coaxial outputs on the dual LNB module and two coaxial inputs on the satellite multi-switch. Connect a 3-foot coaxial cable between the coaxial output on the LNB module and a coaxial input on the satellite multi-switch.

  6. 6

    Connect one end of the 100-foot coaxial cable to a coaxial output on the satellite multi-switch. Run the coaxial cable off the roof and to a window on the side of the house.

  7. 7

    Drill a hole through the wall next to the window with the portable drill. Run the coaxial cable through the hole and along the baseboard of the wall over to a TV that will be used with the second satellite receiver. Apply silicone sealant to the outside and inside of the hole.

  8. 8

    Place the second satellite receiver next to the TV. Connect an HDMI cable between the HDMI output on the satellite receiver and a HDMI input on the TV, if the satellite receiver provides for a high-definition signal; otherwise, connect an S-video cable between the S-video output of the satellite receiver, and connect the left and right RCA plugs at one end of an audio cable to the left and right RCA audio outputs on the satellite receiver and the left and right RCA audio inputs on the TV.

  9. 9

    Screw the free end of the coaxial cable into the coaxial input on the coaxial adaptor. Screw an end of a 3-foot coaxial cable into each of the two coaxial outputs on the coaxial adaptor. Screw the free end of the two coaxial cables into the two coaxial inputs on the back of the satellite receiver.

Tips and warnings

  • All of the satellite components that are added must all be compatible with the satellite that is providing the transmissions to the satellite dish.

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