Installing carpet trim on concrete

Written by elizabeth knoll
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You should install a carpet trim where one carpet transitions to a different type of carpet or flooring. This is common in doorways or in other transitions between rooms. Without the carpet strip, the carpet may begin to fray and look unsightly from repeated foot traffic. When this strip is installed over a wood floor substrate, it's typically hammered in with nails. When the floor substrate is concrete, a few extra steps must be taken to fasten the carpet strip.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Tape measure
  • Carpet transition kit
  • Saw
  • Stain
  • Polyurethane clear coat
  • Foam brushes
  • Marking utensil
  • Hammer drill
  • Hammer drill bit
  • Hammer

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Measure the distance of the area you wish to cover with the carpet trim. Cut the carpet trim at the measured distance.

  2. 2

    Stain the carpet trim the appropriate colour to match your woodwork and apply two coats of polyurethane at your desired sheen. Follow all directions on the stain and polyurethane containers.

  3. 3

    Position the carpet trim into place. One side should cover the edge of the carpet and the other side should cover the edge of the second flooring. Center the strip, if possible, over the two flooring types.

  4. 4

    Mark the floor below the carpet strip through its anchor holes. Use a pencil or other removable marking device.

  5. 5

    Drill a hole at each mark with your hammer drill. The hole diameter should match that of the wooden dowels that came with the carpet strip kit. Drill each hole just as deep as the dowel.

  6. 6

    Hammer one dowel into each drilled hole. Position the carpet trim back into place and ensure each anchoring hole is aligned over a wooden dowel.

  7. 7

    Fasten the carpet trim to the floor with the provided nails. Drive a nail through each anchoring hole into the wooden dowel below.

Tips and warnings

  • Avoid drilling the holes too deep into the concrete. If you do, the wooden dowel will sink down too deep when you try to hammer in the nails.

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