Growing Vines in a Pot

Written by jenny harrington Google
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Growing Vines in a Pot
Potted vines require support. (Vine image by Klarsyn from

Potted vines add both texture and colour to the home. The vines climb up stakes and other supports or can be left to trail over the edge of large pots or hanging baskets. Most vines are grown for their foliage, but some produce flowers. Perennial, evergreen vines, such as ivy, work best for houseplants so their colour can be enjoyed year-round. Outdoors, annual or deciduous vines usually work well in pots.

Skill level:

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Things you need

  • Clay pot
  • Potting soil
  • Stake
  • Fertiliser
  • Plant ties

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  1. 1

    Fill a heavy pot, such as clay, with moistened potting soil. Pot size depends on the type of vine, but an 8- to 10-inch diameter pot is usually sufficient. Insert the stake or support into the soil until it touches the bottom of the pot.

  2. 2

    Plant the vine into the prepared pot. Set the plant so it is at the same depth in the pot that it was at in its nursery pot. Place it two to three inches away from the stake.

  3. 3

    Water when the top inch of soil begins to feel dry. Water at the base of the vine until the excess moisture drains out the bottom of the pot.

  4. 4

    Fertilise potted vines every two months in the spring and summer with a soluble, balanced fertiliser. Apply the fertiliser at the rate recommended on the package for foliage plants.

  5. 5

    Train the vine onto the stake if it doesn't begin climbing on its own. Tie the main stem loosely to the stake with plant tie, spacing the ties every six inches along the stem. Continue to tie the vine until it begins twining around the support by itself.

Tips and warnings

  • Always defer to any plant care instructions included with the vine plant, as some care requirements differ between plant varieties.
  • Most vines requires partial shade or indirect bright light.
  • Not all vines twine. Continue tying or supporting those that don't.

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