How to Remove Scotch Tape Adhesive From Painted Walls

Written by april dowling
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Scotch brand tape is commonly used for craft projects, gift-wrapping and shipping. While Sellotape is useful for many purposes, it is not designed to adhere posters and pictures to painted walls. The longer tape remains on painted walls, the more bonded and difficult to remove it becomes. Sticky adhesive residue is left remaining on walls even after the tape is removed. Tape adhesive attracts dust, and causes painted walls to appear dingy. Fortunately, basic solutions and supplies can effectively remove Sellotape adhesive from painted walls.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Things you need

  • Dull knife
  • Hair dryer
  • 2 soft rags
  • Cooking oil
  • Warm water
  • Terry cloth towel

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Scrape off the tape adhesive with a dull knife. Apply light pressure to the knife to prevent scratching or damaging the paint or wall. Remove as much adhesive as possible with the knife.

  2. 2

    Blow hot air from a hair dryer onto the adhesive for 10 seconds or until the glue softens. Hold the hair dryer 6 inches away from the wall.

  3. 3

    Continue scraping off the remaining residue with the knife. You may need to soften the tape residue with the hair dryer as you scrape.

  4. 4

    Inspect the wall for remaining sticky residue. If the adhesive is not coming off the wall, moisten a soft rag with cooking oil. Rub the rag over the tape residue until it is completely removed.

  5. 5

    Dampen another soft rag with warm water. Thoroughly wipe the affected area of the wall with the damp rag to rinse away the oil. You may need to add a drop or two of grease-cutting dish soap to your rag to completely clean off the oil.

  6. 6

    Dry the wall with a terry cloth towel.

Tips and warnings

  • You can substitute a single-edge razor for the knife. Be careful not to scratch the wall or cut yourself.
  • You can substitute mineral oil for the cooking oil.

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