How to Sharpen Fonts in a Lower Resolution

Written by christopher hanson
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How to Sharpen Fonts in a Lower Resolution
Font sharpness is related to font size and screen resolution. (font of glasnostextraboldfwf image by Pavel Vlasov from Fotolia.com)

The two factors involved in font sharpness are screen resolution and font size. As the size of the font gets smaller in relationship to the screen resolution, the font becomes less sharp. The font can be made sharper by increasing the screen resolution or font size or by using rendering tools that increase the sharpness of the font at low screen resolution. Windows has incorporated a method into its framework that aids in the last of these methods. Text editors, image editors and CSS protocol also support a method for sharpening fonts.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Open the display settings. Click "Start," "Control Panel," "Appearance and Themes," "Display."

  2. 2

    Launch the effects dialogue. Click "Appearance," "Effects."

  3. 3

    Activate ClearType. Click "Use the following method to smooth edges of screen fonts" and select "ClearType." Click "OK."

  1. 1

    Launch a code editor or Notepad. To use Notepad, click "Start," "All Programs," "Accessories," "Notepad."

  2. 2

    Open a CSS file. Click "File," "Open." Choose a CSS file and open it.

  3. 3

    Set "Font-Smooth" to "always." In any tag definition or class, input "font-smooth: always."

  4. 4

    Save the file by clicking "File," "Save."

  1. 1

    Launch a text or image editor.

  2. 2

    Select text by clicking and dragging the mouse across the text to highlight it.

  3. 3

    Set the font properties. Right-click the text and select "Properties." Change the font rendering to "smooth." The label for this setting will vary based on the program used.

  4. 4

    Save the file by clicking "File," "Save."

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