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How to Disable Dell Support Center & Quick Set

Updated July 20, 2017

Dell Support Center and Dell Quick Set are programs that are preinstalled on Dell computers. Dell Support Center is intended to keep your computer running efficiently and up to date by scanning your PC when connected to the Internet and downloading patches, drivers and software upgrades as necessary. Quick Set is an application that monitors power use and other system settings and allows the user to change these settings quickly or automatically with Quick Set. Dell Support Center and Quick Set are configured to run when Windows starts. To conserve system resources, Dell Support Center and Quick Set can be disabled.

Access the Windows Run program. Click the Windows "Start" button, and then click "Run." The Windows Run window will appear.

Access the Windows System Configuration Utility. Type "msconfig" in the Run window, and click "OK." The System Configuration Utility window will open.

View start-up options. Click on the "Startup" tab in the System Configuration Utility window. The programs configured to start automatically with Windows will be listed under the "Startup Item" column.

Deselect the Dell Support Center and Quick Start applications. Uncheck the box next to Dell Support Center in the Startup Item column. Uncheck the box next to Dell Quick Set in the Startup Item column.

Disable the Dell Support Center and Quick Set applications from starting with Windows. Click "OK" at the bottom of the System Configuration Utility window. A Windows dialogue box will prompt you to restart the computer for the start-up configuration changes to take effect.

Restart the computer. Click "OK" in the Windows dialogue box to restart the computer. The computer will restart.

Log on to the computer to view changes. The Dell Support Center and Quick Start applications will not be running.

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About the Author

Goloran Flaherty has been writing since 2002. He composes in-house technical reports, analyses and processes on the subjects of Internet-protocol networking and telecommunications for a Fortune 500 technology company. Flaherty is a Microsoft-certified network engineer and holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from Rutgers University.