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How to Make Paper Fire Logs

Updated February 21, 2017

Chopping wooden logs for a fireplace is not always an option, and purchasing wood to burn is sometimes expensive. Luckily, you can make paper fire logs using paper from around the house and a vegetable can. They take several hours to prepare and will burn similarly to wooden logs. This guide will show you how to produce one paper fire log.

Making paper fire logs

Separate a 2.5cm (1-inch) stack of scrap printer paper into several smaller stacks of three to four pieces each. Fold each of the smaller stacks into themselves, accordion style.

Remove the contents, the wrapper and the ends from the vegetable can. Make sure it is thoroughly cleaned, with no food debris left inside.

Roll the small accordion stacks into a single, tight bundle. Stack them on top of one another, and then twist at the top and bottom of the large stack in opposite directions as tightly as possible.

Slide the vegetable can over the end of the roll and up to the centre. Soak the roll in water for several hours. Remove it from the water and allow it to completely dry.

Place the paper fire log into the fireplace and use it as you would use a wooden log. After burning, remove the vegetable can with a pair of tongs.

Tip

Newspaper can be used to replace the printer paper if necessary or desired. A string can be used instead of a vegetable can. Simply tie the string around the rolled-up paper to keep it in place.

Warning

Never remove the vegetable can from the fireplace by hand. Metal can retain heat for long periods of time. Always use tongs to avoid burns.

Things You'll Need

  • Paper
  • Vegetable can
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About the Author

Willow Sidhe is a freelance writer living in the beautiful Hot Springs, AR. She is a certified aromatherapist with a background in herbalism. She has extensive experience gardening, with a specialty in indoor plants and herbs. Sidhe's work has been published on numerous Web sites, including Gardenguides.com.