How to Make Scars With Liquid Latex

Written by alex smith
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How to Make Scars With Liquid Latex
These scars need no medical treatment. (sign. first aid sign image by L. Shat from Fotolia.com)

Liquid latex is a highly versatile make-up material that can be used to create scars. There are two main types of scars you can create: keloid (raised) scars and indented scars. Both are caused by a wound that has not properly healed, forming scar tissue. Liquid latex scars can be created in whatever styles you can imagine.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Liquid latex
  • Cotton balls
  • Cotton swabs
  • Loose powder
  • Powder puff
  • Make-up

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Gather research photos of actual keloid scars to assist you as you do the make-up.

  2. 2

    Pull a long, thin strip of cotton off of a cotton ball.

  3. 3

    Paint some latex onto your skin with a cotton swab.

  4. 4

    Lay the cotton strip into the latex.

  5. 5

    Cover the cotton with more latex, feathering the edges of the cotton into the skin.

  6. 6

    Allow the latex to dry.

  7. 7

    Powder the latex to prevent it from sticking to itself and damaging your scar.

  8. 8

    Paint the scar and surrounding area with a flesh-coloured make-up that matches your skin.

  9. 9

    Paint the raised portion of the scar with a colour lighter than your skin tone. For darker skin tones, use a flesh colour a few shades lighter than the skin. For lighter skin tones, use a pale pink colour.

  1. 1

    Paint some latex onto your skin with a cotton swab.

  2. 2

    Allow the latex to dry.

  3. 3

    Pinch the skin together, allowing the latex to stick to itself and form a scar.

  4. 4

    Powder the scar.

  5. 5

    Add a little make-up to the scar. It should be a shade or two darker than the skin tone.

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