How to Compare Clay & Cordierite Baking Stones

Written by anise hunter
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How to Compare Clay & Cordierite Baking Stones
Baking stones are known for their ability to produce crisp crusts (CHRISTMAS COOKIES image by SKYDIVECOP from Fotolia.com)

Baking stones are a traditional way to bake, a leftover from the clay ovens of long ago. They are now readily available at cookware stores and through programs like Pampered Chef. Baking stones come in different shapes and sizes and also come in different materials such as clay and cordierite. By comparing the baking done by each type will help you choose the one that best suits you.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Clay baking stone
  • Cordierite baking stone
  • Bread dough
  • Cookie dough
  • Tablespoon

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Preheat the oven to 260 degrees Cor an hour, then let it cool to 176 degrees C before baking. Add cookie dough to the clay baking stone and bake as long as the recipe recommends. Cool.

    Clay stones absorb a lot of moisture. This comparison will help you determine which stone you prefer.

    How to Compare Clay & Cordierite Baking Stones
    Does the clay stone make the cookies too crisp? (cookies image by Penny Williams from Fotolia.com)
  2. 2

    Wipe down the clay baking stone. Preheat the oven to 260 degrees Cor an hour, then let it cool to 176 degrees C before baking. Add bread dough to the stone and bake until a knife comes out clean. Cool.

    How to Compare Clay & Cordierite Baking Stones
    Does the clay stone give the bread texture you like? (bread image by Bube from Fotolia.com)
  3. 3

    Preheat the oven to 260 degrees Cor an hour, let it cool to 176 degrees C before baking.Wipe off the cordierite baking stone and add a tablespoon of cookie dough, enough to make a small cookie. Bake them for the amount of time mentioned in the recipe. Cool.

    How to Compare Clay & Cordierite Baking Stones
    Does the baking stone yield the cookie texture that you like? (chocolate chip cookies image by Kalani from Fotolia.com)
  4. 4

    Preheat the oven to 260 degrees Cor an hour, let it cool to 176 degrees C before baking. Wipe off the cordierite baking stone and buns made out of three tablespoons of bread dough each. Let them rise while the over preheats. Cook them until a knife inserted into the centre comes out clean. Cool.

    How to Compare Clay & Cordierite Baking Stones
    Insert a knife and see if it comes out clean (steel butcher kitchen knife, stainless image by alma_sacra from Fotolia.com)
  5. 5

    Compare the cookies and bread from each stone for inside texture and crispness. Also compare the baking times. Why try both recipes? Cookies are wet at the beginning and then crisp quickly, while bread is moist at the beginning and moist during the cooking process. Determine which texture you like better.

    How to Compare Clay & Cordierite Baking Stones
    Bread contains a lot of moisture while it is baking (bread image by ivan kmit from Fotolia.com)

Tips and warnings

  • Cordierite baking stones often have feet and are a little thicker than clay, which means a longer cooking and preheating time. However, it also means they do not break as easily.
  • Use reduced fat recipes when you use your baking stone, or the stone can absorb the extra fat and cause smoke next time you bake.
  • Cordierite may be an actual baking stone or a shelf from a kiln. Do not use second-hand kiln shelves, because pottery glazes can be toxic. If you do use a kiln shelf, make sure it is not polished because polished shelves are not as porous. A Best Kitchen sells cordierite made for baking.
  • Clay is a popular and traditional material for baking stones. It is similar to baking on a clay tile, but you should not bake on tiles that are not approved for use with food.

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