How to Propagate an Acacia Baileyana

Written by bridget kelly
  • Share
  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Pin
  • Email
How to Propagate an Acacia Baileyana
Acacia baileyana has very fragrant flowers. (Mimosa image by Stefano Maccari from

Acacia baileyana is a large shrub or small tree that thrives in areas with warm weather. Native to Australia, Mexico and the southwestern U.S., this acacia species blooms profusely in early to midwinter, in highly fragrant yellow flowers set against grey-green foliage. The A. baileyana cultivar "Purpurea" produces purple-tipped foliage. All acacia species are easy to propagate with seeds.

Skill level:

Other People Are Reading

Things you need

  • Thermos
  • Vermiculite
  • Sphagnum peat moss
  • 4-inch pots
  • Fertiliser
  • Container
  • Small planting pots
  • Heat mat

Show MoreHide


  1. 1

    Pour boiling water into a Thermos and drop the Acacia baileyana seeds into it. Close the Thermos and allow the seeds to soak for 24 hours. Any seeds that float should be discarded, as they are not viable.

  2. 2

    Combine in a larger container 2 parts vermiculite, 1 part sphagnum peat moss and an all-purpose, slow-release fertiliser, at half the rate listed on the package. Stir until it is combined well. Scoop the mixture into individual, 4-inch planting pots. Pour room-temperature water over each pot until the mixture is uniformly moist. Allow the pots to drain completely.

  3. 3

    Plant one seed per pot, 1-inch deep.

  4. 4

    Set the heat mat to 23.9 degrees Celsius and place it in an area that is slightly shady. Place the pots on top of the mat. Don't allow the planting medium to dry out. Germination should occur in five days to three weeks.

  5. 5

    Remove the pots from the heat mat when the A. baileyana seeds sprout. Keep them in light shade until they have six leaves. Gradually give them more sun every day for a week. Place them in full sun all day thereafter.

Tips and warnings

  • Grow the A. baileyana seedlings indoors over their first winter and transplant them into the garden in early summer.

Don't Miss

  • All types
  • Articles
  • Slideshows
  • Videos
  • Most relevant
  • Most popular
  • Most recent

No articles available

No slideshows available

No videos available

By using the site, you consent to the use of cookies. For more information, please see our Cookie policy.