How to Remove Overexposure in Photoshop

Written by james crider
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How to Remove Overexposure in Photoshop
Use Photoshop to remove excessive or overpowering flash effects. (photographing camera image by sasha from Fotolia.com)

Adobe Photoshop is an incredibly powerful raster graphics program, capable of anything between slight colour adjustment or fully computer-generated landscapes. The various powerful tools built-in to the program mean that for something as simple as an overexposed image, the possibilities for correction are almost unlimited. Not only are there several different methods of compensating for overexposure, but the degree of precision inherent in these methods is exact. A basic understanding of the Photoshop interface is all one needs to correct even the most saturated of photos.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • Windows or Mac computer
  • Adobe Photoshop CS or later

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Open Photoshop and select "File," then "Open." Highlight your desired overexposed image and click "Open." Select "Image," then "Auto-Tone." Observe the results. If these are favourable, continue; if not, press "Control-Z" ("Command-Z" for Mac users) to undo the operation.

  2. 2

    Select "Image," then "Auto-Contrast." Observe the results. If these are favourable, continue; if not, press "Control-Z" ("Command-Z" for Mac users) to undo the operation.

  3. 3

    Select "Image," then "Auto-Color." Observe the results. If these are favourable, continue; if not, press "Control-Z" ("Command-Z" for Mac users) to undo the operation.

  4. 4

    If you're satisfied with your adjustments, select "File," then "Save."

  1. 1

    Select "Image," then "Adjustments," then "Exposure." Make sure that the "Preview" box is checked. Adjust the Exposure, Offset and Gamma Correction sliders, watching as the results apply to your image. Adjust the sliders to your liking and click "OK".

  2. 2

    Select "Image," then "Adjustments," then "Curves." Make sure that the "Preview" box is checked. Using your mouse, click and drag at any point on the histogram line, adjusting the colour curves of the picture. You can do this multiple times to create a curve value with many different apexes. Observe the results in the main window. When you are finished, click "OK."

  3. 3

    Select "Image," then "Adjustments," then "Levels." Make sure that the "Preview" box is checked. Click and drag any of the three Input Level points or two Output Level values to adjust the black and white values in the picture. To adjust individual RGB or CMYK values, select them from the Channel drop-down menu. Observe the results in the main window. When you are finished, click "OK."

  4. 4

    Select "Image," then "Adjustments," then "Shadows/Highlights." Make sure that the "Preview" box is checked. Adjust the sliders for Shadows and Highlights, observing the results in the main window.

  5. 5

    When you're finished adjusting your image, select "File," then "Save."

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