How to Remove Rubber From Car Paint

Written by judy kilpatrick Google
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How to Remove Rubber From Car Paint
Remove unsightly rubber marks from your car paint with auto clay. (car image by apeschi from Fotolia.com)

Remove rubber marks and other contaminants from your car paint to prevent permanent damage to the finish of your car. There are many popular methods for removing rubber from paint. Detailing with auto clay is one of the most thorough and safe methods for rubber removal. Auto clay is used along with a spray lubricant to help the clay slide over the surface of the paint, dislodging contaminants and smoothing the paint surface.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Clay lubricant
  • Auto clay
  • Microfiber towel
  • Pre-wax cleaner
  • Car wax

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Wash and dry your car before you remove rubber from the paint.

    How to Remove Rubber From Car Paint
    Wash your car to remove loose dirt and grime and prevent scratching of the paint surface. (sexy car wash image by jamsi from Fotolia.com)
  2. 2

    Spray a small area, no more than 2 feet square, with clay lubricant.

  3. 3

    Rub your clay bar over the sprayed area. Use back and forth motions, rubbing until the bar glides smoothly over the surface.

  4. 4

    Wipe clay bar residue off the car paint with a microfiber towel.

  5. 5

    Clean with a pre-wax cleaner to condition the paint before waxing.

  6. 6

    Wax the area that was cleaned, or wax the entire car.

    How to Remove Rubber From Car Paint
    Clay bars remove wax from the car paint, so it is necessary to rewax the cleaned area. (Classic Car Bumper and Headlight image by ne_fall_photos from Fotolia.com)

Tips and warnings

  • Check your clay bar frequently for specks of debris and pick them off. Knead the bar frequently to keep a fresh surface.

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