How to cut a Tempered Hardboard

Written by c.l. rease
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How to cut a Tempered Hardboard
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The uses of tempered hardboard range from decorative interior panelling to backing material for painting canvases. A man-made material, hardboard consists of compressed wood fibres embedded in a bonding material. Tempering the hardboard increases its hardness and durability. Standard wood cutting tools cut tempered hardboard in the same manner as regular natural cuts of wood. The orientation of the finished side of the hardboard in relation to the saw blade will determine the finish of the cut.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • Tape measure
  • Carpenter's pencil
  • Drywall square
  • Circular saw
  • 60-grit sandpaper

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Place two marks on the non-finished side of a piece of tempered hardboard with a carpenter's pencil and a tape measure.

  2. 2

    Align the long blade of a drywall square with the pencil marks drawn on the piece of tempered hardboard.

  3. 3

    Rest the marked hardboard on a firm surface with the marked line hanging over the edge of the surface. The finished side of the hardboard must face down to prevent chipping.

  4. 4

    Align the blade of a circular saw with the marked line. Pull the trigger of the saw to begin cutting the hardboard to size. Slowly push the saw across the face of the board. Support the cut-off end of the board as you finish the cut to avoid breaking the end of the hardboard.

  5. 5

    Work 60-grit sandpaper along the cut edge using small back and forth strokes. Continue sanding until no sharp pieces of wood protrude from the cut.

Tips and warnings

  • Always wear eye protection when using a circular saw.

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