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How to Unlock a Locked DVD Case

Updated February 21, 2017

A DVD case used for rentals, for example, from the Blockbuster chain of DVD rental stores, can be protected by a locking mechanism that will ruin the DVD inside if opened. A rented DVD whose case has accidentally been left locked does not have to be returned for unlocking--you can unlock it safely yourself using magnets acquired from a hobby store, hardware supply or even taken out from a broken hard drive. The magnets will unlock the locking mechanism in the case so that the DVD can be removed safely and viewed. No specialised skills are needed and the procedure will also work on those locked DVD cases that are purchased from a rental store's "used" bin.

Hold the DVD case horizontally by the edges in one hand. Place the flat side of one of the two magnets on the right top edge of the DVD case closest to you.

Move the magnet across the length of the DVD case toward the left until it pushes back caused by an attraction to an interior metal tab. Leave the magnet alone at the point where it pushed back.

Place the flat side of the other magnet on the bottom right edge of the DVD case closest to you. Move the magnet across the length of the DVD case toward the left until it pushed back in the same manner as the magnet on the top.

Place the index finger of the hand holding the magnet on the underside of the DVD case onto the magnet on the top of the case.

Move both magnets in concert across the length of the DVD case toward the right until a clicking sound is heard--if there is a coloured tab at the centre edge of the case, move the magnets until the tab disappears to the right.

Remove both magnets from the DVD case. Open the DVD case. Remove the DVD.

Tip

The locking mechanism of the DVD case will remain unlocked once the magnets have been used.

Things You'll Need

  • Two neodymium magnets, 1 inch diameter
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About the Author

Marshal M. Rosenthal is a technology maven with more than 15 years of editorial experience. A graduate of Brooks Institute of Photography with a Bachelor of Arts in photographic arts, his editorial work has appeared both domestically as well as internationally in publications such as "Home Theater," "Electronic House," "eGear," "Computer and Video Games" and "Digitrends."