Obtaining birth certificates for military children born overseas

Written by janice farnsworth
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Obtaining birth certificates for military children born overseas
For families, living overseas is a normal part of military life. (world map image by Attila Toro from Fotolia.com)

Military families travel the world, which means that often, their children are born overseas. They are U.S. citizens. Birth certificates issued for a child born overseas are different from those issued in the United States. Children born overseas must be registered with the consulate in that country. If the certificates are lost or damaged, they are not as easily replaced as birth certificates, but there are steps you can take to obtain a replacement through the State Department.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Damaged FS-240 (Consular report of birth) or notarised affidavit stating original was lost (if applicable)
  • Notarised written request for FS-240
  • $50 fee
  • Notarised written request for DS-1350

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Request, in writing, a replacement copy of the Consular Report of Birth (FS-240). Have the request notarised. Include in the request the full name of the child at birth (plus any adoptive names); the date and place of birth; the names of the subject's parents; the serial number of the FS-240 (on those issued after Nov. 1, 1990), if known; any available passport information; and the signature of the requester.

  2. 2

    Enclose the damaged FS-240 or, in the case of loss, write an affidavit containing the name, date, place of birth of the subject and a statement detailing the whereabouts of the original FS-240. The statement must be signed by the subject, a parent or a legal representative. Have the affidavit notarised.

  3. 3

    Include a £32 fee, made payable to the Department of State. Enclose a copy of a valid photo identification.

  4. 4

    Mail the required documents to:

    Vital Records Section

    Passport Services

    1111 19th St.. NW, Suite 510

    Washington, DC 20522-1705

    (see reference 1)

  5. 5

    202-955-0307 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting              202-955-0307      end_of_the_skype_highlighting begin_of_the_skype_highlighting              202-955-0307      end_of_the_skype_highlighting to make sure that requirements and fees have not changed. Call the vital records division at 202-955-0307 to make sure that requirements and fees have not changed.

  1. 1

    Request in writing a copy of the Certification of Report of Birth (DS-1350). Have the request notarised. Include in the request the full name of the child at birth (plus any adoptive names); the date and place of birth; the names of the subject's parents; the serial number of the FS-240 (on those issued after Nov.1, 1990), if known; any available passport information; and the signature of the requester. The DS-1350 is acceptable for all legal purposes. No affidavit is required to get a copy of it.

  2. 2

    Include a £32 fee, made payable to the Department of State. Enclose a copy of a valid photo identification.

  3. 3

    Mail the required documents to:

    Vital Records Section

    Passport Services

    1111 19th St. NW, Suite 510

    Washington, DC 20522-1705

  4. 4

    Call the vital records division at 202-955-0307 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting              202-955-0307      end_of_the_skype_highlighting begin_of_the_skype_highlighting              202-955-0307      end_of_the_skype_highlighting to make sure that requirements and fees have not changed.

Tips and warnings

  • Either the FS-240 or the DS-1350 are considered legal proof of citizenship.
  • Make payment by a check drawn on a bank in the United States or by money order.
  • Passport Vital Records walk-in services are available at the Washington Passport Agency:
  • 1111 19th St., Washington, DC 20524
  • Hours are 9 to 11 a.m. and 2 to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. No appointment is necessary, but you must have valid identification to enter the agency.
  • Do not send cash for payment of the fee. The agency is not responsible for cash lost in the mail.

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