How to Build a Simple Electric Toy Vehicle

Written by jonathan pfeiffer
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How to Build a Simple Electric Toy Vehicle
Radio controlled vehicles can take all forms. (Radio-controlled model of the red car close-up image by terex from Fotolia.com)

Electric toy vehicles offer the excitement of racing and speed on a miniature scale. Many kids will own a variety of electric radio-controlled vehicles, and for many, this hobby can continue into adulthood. While basic electric cars won’t give the best performance or speed, you can build them at low cost and operate them with minimal maintenance.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Chassis
  • Motors
  • Remote control kit
  • Electronic speed control
  • Batteries
  • 4 wheels

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Create a chassis, the mainframe that houses the batteries, wheels, remote control receiver and motor. Wood is the most advantageous material to use as it is light and easy to drill. Other options are plastic or metal.

  2. 2

    Attach the DC motors to the chassis on the motor mounts. The motors must fall within a range of 300 to 500 RPM. Since the car will utilise a differential turning mechanism, the shafts of each motor should be in line with one another when connected. This allows for the most simplistic steering method by activating one motor while deactivating the other motor.

  3. 3

    Mount the electronic speed control and remote control kit on the chassis in front of the motor mounts.

  4. 4

    Install the batteries. The optimum batteries are alkaline or zinc carbon type. They should be rechargeable. The typical 300 to 500 RPM motor uses approximately 9 to 12 volts. You can provide more power with a series parallel combination of batteries.

  5. 5

    Install two types of wheels: the two wheels in the back for traction and propulsion, and the front wheels for traction and turning. Mount each of these sets of wheels on shafts, locked in place with screws or using masking tape to cover the shaft for a snug fit.

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