How to Replace an Ethernet Plug

Written by norm dickinson Google
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Replace an Ethernet plug by cutting it off an inch from the connector, stripping the wires back, and crimping the new plug in place. This is often an easy cure for connectivity issues with older cables that are poorly terminated or have a lot of wear and tear. It is a common practice to replace an Ethernet plug when cables are routed through walls or ceilings and cannot be easily replaced. There are two basic types of Ethernet plugs, straight-through for connecting a computer to a hub or switch, and crossover for connecting two computers or hubs or switches together.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Things you need

  • Wire cutter
  • Network cable stripper
  • Ethernet male connector
  • Ethernet crimping tool

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Instructions

    Replacing the Plug

  1. 1

    Cut the existing plug off at least an inch back from the end of the cable to avoid using weak or damaged conductors.

  2. 2

    Strip the insulation back from the end of the cable using a network cable stripper designed for the purpose in order to get the correct amount of cable exposed. Alternately strip just enough insulation from the main cable to expose about a half inch of the inner conductors, but do not strip the insulation from the individual conductors.

  3. 3

    Straighten out the conductors and lay them flat side by side in the same order that they will go into the Ethernet male connector. Reference the connector that was just cut off to determine the existing colour coding or use the colour coding standards listed in this article if replacing both ends of a cable or building a cable from scratch.

  4. 4

    Trim the ends of the conductors so that they are all the same length when lying flat side by side in the sequence they are going to be installed in. Insert the conductors as a group into the Ethernet male connector so that each conductor slides all the way into its slot in the connector and the colours are lined up in the desired order. The outer insulation of the cable should also be inserted into the connector in order to be crimped into place when the connection is finalised. If the conductors do not reach the tip of the connector or the outer insulation will not be crimped inside the connector the cable should be removed and trimmed to fit prior to crimping.

  5. 5

    Crimp the connector onto the end of the cable using the crimping tool and inspect the finished connection to ensure the conductors are all seated fully into the end of the connector and that the insulation of the outer jacket is crimped into the connector for a solid connection. Pull on the cable and connector to test the connection for a solid crimp and if there are any problems with the connection simply cut off this connector and start over.

    Colour Coding Standard Connections

  1. 1

    Connect the White/Orange conductor to pin 1 of the connector. Connect the Orange conductor to pin 2 of the connector.

  2. 2

    Connect the White/Green conductor to pin 3 of the connector. Connect the Blue conductor to pin 4 of the connector.

  3. 3

    Connect the White/Blue conductor to pin 5 of the connector. Connect the Green conductor to pin 6 of the connector.

  4. 4

    Connect the White/Brown conductor to pin 7 of the connector. Connect the Brown conductor to pin 8 of the connector.

    Colour Coding Crossover Connections

  1. 1

    Connect the White/Green conductor to pin 1 of the connector. Connect the Green conductor to pin 2 of the connector.

  2. 2

    Connect the White/Orange conductor to pin 3 of the connector. Connect the Blue conductor to pin 4 of the connector.

  3. 3

    Connect the White/Blue conductor to pin 5 of the connector. Connect the Orange conductor to pin 6 of the connector.

  4. 4

    Connect the White/Brown conductor to pin 7 of the connector. Connect the Brown conductor to pin 8 of the connector.

Tips and warnings

  • A cable tester can perform an analysis of the cable to determine whether the plug should be replaced or to test the new connection. If the cable is visible for its entire length it may be much easier to replace the entire cable instead of crimping new ends onto the existing one. Buy a package of several Ethernet male connectors instead of just one or two as it is common to have to attempt this operation several times when first learning how to correctly make the connection. There are several colour coding standards but the most popular is the EIA/TIA 568B standard shown here. The particular colours used are not as important as connecting the pins in the right order.
  • Disconnect both ends of a cable prior to cutting it or crimping ends onto it to prevent damaging network equipment. Never splice two or more cables together to increase the length of the cable as the connection will incur a signal loss and communication issues will be likely.

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