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How to tie off macrame

Updated February 21, 2017

The way you finish your macrame project can make it look professional and hold up to daily use--or not. Not only is the finish important for appearance, adding a distinctive touch to your macrame, but it secures the work as well, preventing unravelling. Begin with a few simple knots and fastening techniques to finish projects, then practice the more elaborate knots to expand your finishing options--elevating the look of your work.

Tie an overhand knot in each cord at the end of your project. This is a simple finish, but effective for many pieces. Form a loop and thread the end of the twine up and through, pulling the knot tight against the last macrame knot of your project. Trim the ends below the overhand knots. Dab a bit of clear household glue or nail polish onto the knot to prevent unravelling.

Wrap several cords together, if a simple overhand knot is insufficient. You can do a narrow wrap or make it several inches long. Loop one end of a length of macrame cord and lay the loop along the cords to be wrapped. Begin wrapping with the opposite end of the cord from the bottom up. Leave a bit of loop at the top and thread the end of the cord through it. Pull the bottom of the loop cord. This will tuck the end of the loop and the wrap thread down into the knot. Trim the ends.

Fluff the ends of your macrame project, if it is of material that fluffs well. You can do this with the ends after an overhand knot or a wrap rather than trimming them short. Cotton or nylon work best. Unravel the cords after the final knot or wrap and brush until fluffy. Trim the tips so all are even.

Add beads at the very end of your project if you are working with macrame cords that do not fluff well. Trim the cords evenly, then thread on a bead, tying an overhand knot at the very end of the cord. Trim off any excess cord and dab a bit of clear household glue or nail polish on the end.

Things You'll Need

  • Household glue or clear nail polish
  • Beads
  • Scissors
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About the Author

Margaret Mills has been writing for more than 30 years, focusing on articles about religion, forestry, gardening and crafts. Her work has appeared in religious periodicals including "Focus on the Family" and similar publications. Mills has a Bachelor of Arts in English from Northwest Nazarene University.