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How to Remove a Cup Ring Off of a Wood Table

Updated March 23, 2017

Water rings are difficult to remove from wood furniture, but not impossible. Water rings happen when a cup is placed on wood furniture, and the moisture from the cup is able to penetrate the wood surface. The moisture becomes trapped and an unsightly ring forms. Luckily, there are quite a few methods that can remove these cup rings from wood. If one method does not take care of the problem, you can try another without causing any harm to your furniture.

Apply a small amount of real mayonnaise to a damp soft cloth.

Rub the mayonnaise into the ring in a circular motion until it disappears.

Buff the wood surface with a clean soft cloth.

Make a paste of 1 tbsp baking soda and 1 tsp water. Be careful not to add too much water.

Rub the baking soda paste gently onto the water ring with a clean soft cloth until the mark disappears.

Buff the wood surface with a clean soft cloth.

Mix 1 tsp salt with a few drops of water to make a paste. Be careful not to add too much water because you want a thick paste to draw the water out of the wood.

Rub the salt paste gently onto the wood with a soft cloth until the water mark disappears.

Buff the wood surface with a clean soft cloth.

Apply petroleum jelly to the water ring with your finger.

Let the petroleum jelly sit on the water ring overnight.

Wipe the petroleum jelly from the wood with a clean soft cloth and buff the wood.

Mix equal parts white vinegar and olive oil.

Apply the vinegar and olive oil to the wood surface with a clean soft cloth. Follow the wood grain and apply only a small amount of the mixture at a time until the water ring disappears.

Use a clean soft cloth to shine the wood.

Tip

You can leave real mayonnaise on water rings overnight if they are particularly old or stubborn water marks. You can make a paste of cigar or cigarette ashes and apply it to water rings as well. To prevent water rings from forming on furniture, use coasters and place mats.

Things You'll Need

  • Real mayonnaise
  • Soft cloths
  • 1 tbsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp salt
  • Petroleum jelly
  • White vinegar
  • Olive oil
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About the Author

Cricket Webber began writing for fun as a young adult and started writing professionally in 2010. She is based in the deep South. Webber specializes in articles on greener living. Her work has appeared in various online publications. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in education from Converse College.